Tombstone Tuesday- Elizabeth Quimby

Elizabeth Quimbey died March 17. 1826. in the 60. years of her age.

Go home my friend.

Dry your tears,

I must lie here

Till Christ appears.

Elizabeth Quimby was my 5th great-aunt.

Elizabeth Quimby born 4 Jul 1757 Kingston, Rockingham County, New Hampshire To Moses Quimby (1713-1797) and Judah/Judith Bean (1732-1817.)

 

Source:

1.Ancestry.com, “New Hampshire, Birth Records, 1659-1900,” database, Ancestry.com 1997-2017 https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/86776289/person/48543204906/facts : accessed 9 Oct 2017, entry for Elizabeth Quimby, 20:1 exposure setting 11-12filmstrip image 516 of 5096 .

2. Butka June photographer, Tombstone Elizabeth Quimby, Sutton Mills Cemetery, Sutton Merrimack, New Hampshire, September 5 2012, privately held by June Stearns Butka, (Address for Private use,) Merrimack, New Hampshire, 2017, aka Old Meetinghouse Cemetery.

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Step by Step Approach Researching Ancestry DNA matches

I’m not an experienced DNA researcher, even though I had my first DNA test done five years ago. It is only recently that I fine-tuned my approach to matches. When I first started I only worked with those matches with trees. It was a good way to get your feet wet and practice researching how the matches and the PAPER trail to our common ancestor work.

I read [and still do] anything I can get my hands on about DNA. I’ve joined Facebook pages offering tips and a DNA Special Interest Group at the local library. [You will fine links to these under sources]

I start my DNA research by looking for any new matches. Usually the closet matches are at the top of the page.

  1. View all DNA matches
  2. Click on New matches 3. Choose the newest match. Enter into the Excel Worksheet [You can use a notebook, instead. The important thing is to track your research.]4. Enter the Predicated Relationship, centimorgans and DNA Segments. If it list the Common Ancestor/s enter them and the relationship to you. If not listed leave that blank until known.

5. Don’t worry if there is no tree Click on the matches’ names, then click shared matches. 

 

6. Hopefully other people will show up. I then check my Excel spreadsheet to see if they match someone I already entered; See who the Common ancestor was. This gives me an idea of what line of my Ancestor Member Tree to look at.

7. If you are not ready to work without a tree, go to the next person with a tree. You should see a list of common names and a pedigree chart. REMEMBER THESE ARE HINTS, you still need to view the paper trail for both your cousin match and your line.8. If you are lucky sometimes Ancestry already gives you a hint to the Common Shared Ancestor. 9. Remember these are hints, you must make sure the paper trail matches both sides. I look for birth, death, and marriage records. If those are not enough to prove hints to the relationships I look at Find A Grave [Caution Find A Grave is a hint,] for each generation. Using Find A grave sometimes gives you another person to look at that has the record hint you need. I do use census records to get additional clues, especially for locations, time frames and family groupings to rule out/in that they are the same person as in my line. [There were 4 Jacob Chases in the Newbury/Warner/Hopkinton area with the same Christian names in each family unit. Look for the one that matches your unit that is unique.]

10. I click on each shared name until I get a match or close time frame match.11. I compared it with my surnames in my tree It looks like I have a generation or two separation here. I clicked on John and found the father’s name George Lane About 1612-4 June 1689. My Ancestry tree list shows a George 1613-1689. A possible match and my place to start my

12. I click on view full tree [the green square upper right] go to George Lane. I also open in a separate window my AMT for George Lane. Lots of great HINTS. Time to verify the paper trail for each generation. 

13. I keep my DNA match hint open in a separate window to refer back to when needed for each generation.

14. When I have verified or disproven the relationship I post it in my Excel Worksheet (#3). I use the spreadsheet shown in #10 to confirm the relationship. Yes, Ancestry gives my relationship to the common ancestor. I still like to check out my work. This makes me list each generation again on both sides.

Happy DNA match climbing.

Resources to seek out: Here is just a few free options. There are many other options both Free and for a Fee. I did add the “Genetic Genealogy in Practice” workbook. If you are going to spend money it is worth the price, in my opinion.

  1. Genetic Genealogy Tips & Techniques group on Facebook
  2. Check your area for DNA Special Interest Groups.
  3. Check out You Tube for DNA
  4. Dear Myrtle’s Wacky Wednesday with Blaine Bettinger
  5. “Genetic Genealogy in Practice” by Blaine T. Bettinger & Debbie Parker Wayne $

I hope this post helps with your DNA match research.

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Fishing Tales and Your Ancestors

We all have family fishing tales of whose fish is the biggest. Town histories even get into telling fishing tales. That is a good thing for those of us looking for our ancestors. It gives a residence, a year and sometimes an occupation for them. Here is one page from “A History of the Town of Industry, Franklin County, Maine …” page 21

Industry Maine 1892 History

The 1892 history of Industry, Maine tells the tale of Isaac Webster, a shoemaker by trade “who died, at an advanced age, a few years since, in Taunton, Massachusetts.” Isaac moved to Industry from Stark and settled in the village of Allen’s Mill for several years.

The largest trout caught by Isaac weighed 17 ¾ pounds.

Others listed for catching large fish are:

John Daggett

John Wesley Norton

Samuel Rackliff

James C. Luce

Luther Luce, Sr.

Rueben Hatch, Sr.

Nelson W. Fish

John Atwell Daggett

John F. Daggett

William R. Daggett

Fred F. Backus

Truman Luce (1833)

Daniel Sanders Collins (1857)

Harry Pierce of Farmington (July 1890)

John Richards of Boston (July 1890)

Chas. E. Oliver of West Mill’s (1885)

John L. Sterry of Stark (1891)

George W. Dobbins of Boston (1889)

Herbert B. Luce of Allen’s Mills (1883)

Henry O. Stanley of Dixfield (1883) State Fish Commissioner

Chas. Augustus Allen of Farmington

A history of the town of Industry, Franklin County, Maine, from the earliest settlement in 1787 down to the present time, embracing the cessions of New Sharon, New Vineyard, Anson, and Stark. In two parts, including the history and genealogy of many of the leading families of the town

by Hatch, William Collins

Publication date 1893

Topics Industry, Maine, Industry, Maine, genealogy

Publisher Farmington, Me., Press of Knowlton, McLeary & Co.

Collection allen_county; americana

Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive

Contributor Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center

Language English

Volume Pt. 1

Notes

Digital image of a photocopied book. Irregular pagination. No copyright page found.

Bookplateleaf 0004

Call number 31833011871297

Camera Canon EOS 5D Mark II

Identifier historyoftownofi01hatc

Identifier-ark ark:/13960/t3hx4ct0d

Invoice 11

Lccn 01008972

Ocr ABBYY FineReader 9.0

Page-progression lr

Pages 894

Ppi 500

Scandate 20141216165122

Scanner scribe2.indiana.archive.org

Scanningcenter indiana

Full catalog record MARCXML

 

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Immigrants remembered

Pictures In Verse Poetry Contest entry 2017

Bill West recently reminded us of his annual Genealogy Poetry Challenge. I decided that this poem honors our nation’s early immigrant’s culture from whence they came and their descendants. It gives a sense of where we came from.

I believe the sentiment expressed in this poem could be applied to immigrants to our nation today. Life is uncertain, filled with the unknown. It’s how we deal with Life that determines who we are.

Today I honor my 8th great-grandfather, John MacBean/Bean.

While researching my John MacBean/Bean lineage, for an Ancestry DNA hint, I came across this poem written by Mrs. Alice Bean Lodge of Gilmanton, New Hampshire (31 Aug 1899); read by Mrs. E. W. Johnson of East Wilton, Maine, for the Fourth Annual Reunion of John Bean (1660) Association at Portland, Maine 31 Aug 1899.

Picture In Verse

Good morrow, friends and kinsmen,

I greet you one and all,

Who’ve seen the fiery Cross go forth

And heard the bugle call.

Ours be a peaceful meeting,

We need no cross or flame,

No plaid or Scottish bonnet

To tell from whence we came.

With pride of ancient ancestry

And love of Highland lore,

Our hearts may be as leal and true

As those who lived of yore.

Warriors were they, and artizans,

Our coat of arms doth show

An arm and hand, with dagger raised

To strike an avenging blow.

The motto of ye olden time

Sounds strange to us to-day,

But in the seventh century,

When Douglas Bayne held sway,

They challenged every man they met,

They made him stand and show

What might his name and station be

And whether friend or foe.

“Touch not the cat without a glove,”

Or you may rue the day

You made him lift the velvet paw,

Or stroked him the wrong way.

Clan Chattan’s foes may well beware,

Her sons are strong and fleet,

And a mountain wildcat might not be

A pleasant thing to meet.

Let us go back to those old days

And see the life they led,

Their home a mountain cavern,

Their dress, the Highland plaid;

Their bed of flinty rock was strewn

With heather and wild fern,

And they drank the sparkling water

From out of the nearest burn.

With trusty bow and arrow

They chased they flying roe,

And watched the mountain passes

To guard against the foe.

While from the castle on the cliff

The watchman, old and grey,

Gave warning to the warder

To keep the foe away.

Within the castle all looked bright,

The knights were brave and true,

The ladies taught their maids

To spin, tow weave and sew.

The laird was father of his clan,

The lady, sweet and fair,

Made all the poor and stricken ones

Their own especial care.

Their peaceful days were brimming o’er

With happiness, I ween,

When all the lads and lassies met

To dance upon the green.

With hearts as light as thistle-down,

With laughter, song and jest,

Each Lassie laced her bodice blue,

Each laddie donned his best;

The lairds looked on approvingly,

My lady with a smile,

The older folks sat round in groups

To chat and rest awhile.

And e’en the poor were not forgot,

Who through the twilight stole,

With bag in hand from door to door

To gather up the dole.

What visions danced before their eyes

As they white sails unfurled,

To seek for home and fortune

In a strange, far off new world.

What anxious days were those at sea,

When parted from the land,

They steered their bark to westward

Till they reached a rocky strand.

Tho’ few indeed their numbers were,

Their hearts were stout and bold;

The dangers met, the toils they shared

Have oftentimes been told.

The German sighs for Fatherland,

The Switzer mourns his mountains

With many a silent tear;

And tho’ Columbia beckons

And the future may beguile,

The bells of Shandon still sound sweet

To the sons of Erin’s Isle.

We talk of Merry England,

The vine-clad hills of France,

Of Spain and her Alhambra,

Of Moorish song and dance;

Italia’s charms and chanted oft

By light of the silver moon,

And we sing of bonny Scotland,

“Ye banks and braes of Doon.”

And why from lands so fair and fine

Is it so many come?

In the fair land—America__

A man can own his home;

Freedom of thought and action,

A chance to see and know,

The land is board, and fair, and free

Wherever he may go.

Her flag is known in every port,

Her ships sail every sea,

She stretches out her strong right arm

To help the oppressed go free.

The morning sun shines brightly

When he leaves his ocean bed

Upon a busy commerce

And crowded marts of trade—

Upon a restless people

Who hurry to and fro,

As here and there with eager steps

Throughout the land they go.

‘Tis true the world is very wide,

And some are sure to find

In leaving home that they have left

Their “Fortunate Isles” behind.

And tho’ like Esmeralda,

We “sing in every bower,”

Or like the bee who all day long

Sips honey from each flower,

When twilight closes round us

Wherever we may be,

We hear our Mother singing

Aneath the “Rowen tree;”

And with the Germans “Wanderer,”

Our hearts cry out, “Where art thou.

O my beloved home>’

And you whose lives are shadowed

By grief, or pain, or loss,

From whom the sky is darkened,

And gold is naught but dross,

Worn out with tears and watching,

Caught by the undertow

And carried outward by the tide

Wherever it may go;

Helpless to bear life’s burdens,

Yet hoping while you call,

That haven may prove a refuge

And a resting place for all.

Look up for strength and courage,

Take note of little things,

You may see angels’ faces

And hear the sound of wings.

Old Allan Bayne, that harp of thine

Has mute remained for many a year,

The chords that thrilled the soul are hushed,

The hand that touched them is not here.

How often in the olden days

Unseen it welcomed many a guest;

It cheered his sorrows, soothed his fears,

And gently lulled to rest.

But when the clansmen filled the hall

To talk of deed by field and foray,

How loud and clear the notes that rang,

While sand the bard of fame and glory.

And when the exile wandered forth

To shadowy cave and forest near,

The ancient harper followed on

To charm and make his life less drear.

O, ancient harper, may my strain

Allure, and comfort as thine own;

Let joybells ring, and Hope’s bright ray

Illume a future all unknown,

For life may yet hold much of good,

Tho’ often mixed with grief and care,

And flowers still loom and birds yet sing

As in old Scotland vales so fair.

 

Written by Mrs. Alice Bean Lodge

 

Source:

  1. Proceedings of the John Bean (1660) https://archive.org/stream/proceedingsofjoh1899john#page/101/mode/1up

 

  1. Bill West 9th Annual Great Genealogy Poetry Challenge https://westinnewengland.blogspot.com/2017/08/the-ninth-annual-great-genealogy-poetry.html

 

Citation:

  1. John Bean Association Proceedings of the John Bean (1660) Association, at its annual reunion, accessed 7 September 2017, from https://archive.org/details/proceedingsofjoh1899john; publisher S I-The Association, 1899, collection Allen County Americana digitalized, Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center, published 1899, call number 31833012005747, image pg100-104

 

  1. West, Bill (2017) West In New England 30 Aug 2017 Bill West 9th Annual Great Genealogy Poetry Challenge, accessed 7 September 2017 https://westinnewengland.blogspot.com/2017/08/the-ninth-annual-great-genealogy-poetry.html

 

My lineage:

John MacBean/Bean 1634-1718 & Margaret Edwards 1640-1714

James Bean 1672-1753 & Sarah Bradley 1673-1738

Samuel Bean 1710-1786 &Mary Buzzell 1714-1812

Judith Bean 1732-1817 &Moses Quimby 1713-1826

Hannah Quimby 1759-1831 & Philip Nelson 1756-1841

William Nelson 1795-1869 & Patty Teel 1795-1891

Benjamin P. Nelson 1824-1862 & Elinor M. Babb 1830-1906

William F. Nelson 1855-1932 & Clara J. Chase 1875-1955, my great-grandparents

Lillian M. Nelson 1895-1934 & Nathan A. Stearns 1887-1851, my grandparents

Nelson W. Stearns 1930-1988 & Shirley B. Pease 1935-2001, my parents

 

Judith Bean 1732-1817 &Moses Quimby 1713-1826 are founding families of Sutton, Merrimack, New Hampshire the home of my heart.

Source:

  1. Proceedings of the John Bean (1660) https://archive.org/stream/proceedingsofjoh1899john#page/101/mode/1up

 

  1. Bill West 9th Annual Great Genealogy Poetry Challenge https://westinnewengland.blogspot.com/2017/08/the-ninth-annual-great-genealogy-poetry.html

 

Citation:

  1. John Bean Association Proceedings of the John Bean (1660) Association, at its annual reunion, accessed 7 September 2017, from https://archive.org/details/proceedingsofjoh1899john; publisher S I-The Association, 1899, collection Allen County Americana digitalized, Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center, published 1899, call number 31833012005747, image pg100-104

 

  1. West, Bill (2017) West In New England 30 Aug 2017 Bill West 9th Annual Great Genealogy Poetry Challenge, accessed 7 September 2017 https://westinnewengland.blogspot.com/2017/08/the-ninth-annual-great-genealogy-poetry.html

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Niagara Falls & River Railway Power House

Niagara Falls & River Railway Power House

Day 2 (13 June 2017) of our Road trip found us taking a limo tour of Niagara Falls. The history behind them was an amazing trip in time. The tour gave an overview of the formation, preservation, above and BELOW The Falls.

Did you have an ancestor who work on the construction of the tunnels?

Wikipedia gives an overview. Below is a quick overview of the Power Plants the use the water to power the area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Niagara_Falls_hydroelectric_generating_plants

  • “Niagara Falls & River Railway Power House, operating in Niagara Falls, Ontario’s Queen Victoria Park between 1892 and 1932, supplying electricity to its trains operating between Queenston and Chippawa.
  • William Birch Rankine Power Station, opened in 1905 by the Canadian Niagara Power Company which was founded in 1892. It was purchased by the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation in 1950, and then by the Fortis Incorporated Power Group in 1999-2000, after which it was retired from service following an agreement with Ontario Power Generation, the provincial utility.
  • Ontario Power Company, also opened in 1905, purchased by the Ontario Hydro Power Commission in 1917 and then decommissioned in 1999.
  • Electrical Development Company (EDC), later named the Toronto Power Company, operating between 1906 and 1973.
  • Sir Adam Beck Hydroelectric Generating Stations, are two hydroelectric generating stations in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, opened in 1922 and originally named the Queenston Chippawa Power Station. It was renamed after Sir Adam Beck in 1950, with significant expansions in 1954 and 2013. The two major power stations at the site are called Adam Beck I and Adam Beck II.”
  • From the Limo

    Under The Falls

    Tunnel Construction

    American Falls as seen from Canada

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How I use my “We’re Related” Application

How I use my “We’re Related App.

Russ Worthington posted a question in his “We’re Related” Facebook Closed Group, asking how we use our We’re Related app. I posted a quick answer.

Then I decided since I was working with a new hint from my app, I would record each step in a blog. It showed that the quick answer I gave Russ left a few steps out of how I use the application.

This is MY Own Way of Researching. You probably have your way.

My goal is to show one way to research those hints from the We’re Related app.  The same principles can be used for any hints you find.

My second goal is in honor of Women’s History Month, I plan to find one new female ancestor each week in March 2017.

 

  1. I add the people hints first to my Excel Spreadsheet Data, using Russ Worthington’s format.
    We're Related App

    We’re Related App

    2. I check my Main Ancestry Tree, to see if the people are there.

    Ancestry Fowler Search

    Ancestry Fowler Search

    3. I continue searching until I find the generation in my tree. No “Ring” Surname, then checked Colby. I do have a Judith Colby the mother of John Collins in my Ancestry Family Tree.
    4. Using the information from the We’re Related Application on Ancestry’s search

    Ancestry Search Bar

    Ancestry Search Bar

    Ancestry Search page

    Ancestry Search page

    Judith Colby results

    Judith Colby results

    5. I NOW have 153 hints to research

    6. I do the same filter search in Family Serach

    Judith Colby Family Search Results
    7. It yielded only a Family Tree, no records. I do not search Family trees, unless I hit a brick wall. Thia prevents ME from becoming lazy in my OWN research.

     

    8. I compare my person, Judith Colby, with my Ancestry Tree information I already researched. I also check my shoebox for any save records that may be for Judith Colby. I did have one for birth for a Judith born of Judith and Er Colby on 7 Oct 1764. I also had save to Judith a Find A Grave Record with the same birth date.

9. I DO NOT add this birth record to my tree. The other hints from my Ancestry search need to be evaluated for location, and possible parentage of Judith.

10. I will go to the next generation, Judith Ring and do the same research I did for Judith Colby.

11. I will research, town histories, deeds, [no censuses for this time frame will give me names of the household members,] marriage records and death records. This is just a few of the records I research and compare, before adding Judith Colby’s parents.

Source information:

  1. Ancestry We’re Related App, http://www.ancestry.com/wererelated/share/ (accessed 3 Mar 2017) via IPhone
  2. Ancestry, https://www.ancestry.com/ Stearns Butka Family Tree (accessed 3 Mar 2017)
  3. FamilySearch Rights and Use Information (Updated 2/3/2015) | Privacy Policy (Updated 3/18/2014) © 2017 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. A service provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
  4. com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

 

 

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January 2017 Recap Week 1

I may not be posting here in my blog post as much as I should. I am posting on Facebook. Below is a recap for the first week of January 1-7, 2017.

My goal is to at least post a monthly review of my Facebook posting here. February will follow in a day or two.

I did something unusual for the New Year, No resolutions other than to take each day as it comes with a smile and enjoy the moment.

1 Jan 2017 post on June Stearns Butka’s Facebook Page:

We each have our crosses to bear. It is how we deal with them that makes us who we are.

It is difficult sometimes to accept the changes, that some perceive as weaknesses.

Naomi King reminded me that, although I can’t do what I once was capable of, I still have a lot to offer.

I may not be able to bake, cook or make crafts, due to the muscle weakness; I can still offer support, love and give my family a sense of where we came from.

We are made of strong stuff, we stay positive and we adjust to what life has given us.

Live life to the fullest, no matter what challenges you meet. You will be happy with yourself. Maybe even at peace with yourself.

Happy New Year. 🎆

This is my wish for all of you: love yourself, accept what challenges life gives you, and maybe life will be brighter, happier and healing of spirit for the New Year.

4 Jan 2017 post on June Stearns Butka’s Facebook Page:

I quick challenge to my family and friends.

Name one thing about yourself that most people don’t know about.

I’ll start.

Did you know that I helped my Dad, build and race Dune Buggies?

Friend Responses included:

  1. Friend I learned how to take a car engine apart and put back together with my dad. June Stearns Butka I didn’t know that we had progressive Dad’s. Friend Yes I guess we did that’s why we are so close. 😀😀😀❤❤❤
  1. Friendt Did you know that my first language was French? June Stearns Butka Yes, You mentioned it once.
  2. Friend first language was Polish; I studied concert piano for years. On my 16th birthday my Dad bought a Steinway Grand Piano which is no in my sister’s house.

 

January 4th also carried the sad news of Carrie Fisher’s death. I great loss for the world entertainment community, her family and friends. She was taken ill on her flight home after completing the filming of a Star Wars movie.

A Productive day: Dear Myrtle at noon Genealogy Proof Standard Study Group,” Book Club In the Blood,’ Webinar Wednesday DNA, Joe Hill Live (on Facebook) newest book discussion and top the night off with Dear Myrtle Wacky Wednesday Pinterest and Public Television Castles of King Ludwig ll.

5 Jan 2017 post on June Stearns Butka’s Facebook Page:

Genealogy Tip for today:

One that bears repeating- Review the whole page for family, including notes and side bars.

Lines 25 & 26, 31, 32, 33, 34 & 35 are one family. You will notice that the Derosby Family divides them. The Ancestry index list lines 31-35 as child for John C. Derosby. Where in fact they are the children of Edna. Edna is the mother of all the children on line 31-35. Walter is the father of Walter line 31

Check the house number and the sidebar for more hints of corrections when reviewing any documents.

1930 US Census Waterville Maine

1930 US Census Waterville Maine

7 Jan 2017 post on June Stearns Butka’s Facebook Page:

Today’s Genealogy tip:

Take time to review for duplicate entries on your Ancestry People list. Check any Family Tree for duplicates.

Sometimes, especially in the early days of my tree, I forget to check that the person is already in my tree linked to another person, before adding them to my tree.

You save yourself a lot of work when verifying and merging your duplicates.

I’m still cleaning up my tree I began with on Ancestry. It is a slow process but one that is needed to be done.

I try each month to review for duplicates. Even through I leave off at a certain letter, if I worked on my tree in the interim, I go back to the letter “A” and review from the beginning.

I was slack in reviewing when working on a project as a Christmas gift. So, I started at the beginning. I made to the “C’s” before I decided I should write the Genealogy Tip for today.

It looks like I need to verify if my Samuel Chase’s are different people.

Bonus Tip: Even if they have a DOB within 3 years of each other and not DOD, on at least one, I verify that they are not the same person. Same in the reverse, if I have a DOD and not DOB for at least one, I check it.

Happy Reviewing.

Partial Ancestry People List

Partial Ancestry People List

 

Most of the first week of January was down time to recuperate from holiday gatherings. We all need to remember the importance of Heal thyself.

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