Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 5

“Museum De Lakenhal”  continued (part 5)

I hope you enjoyed Part 1 and Part 2 of Mayflower 400 Leiden virtual journey. Click here to see Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 1, Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 2 here. Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 3 here.  Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 4 here.

I was granted permission to take screen captures during the virtual tour. Our host, Michael Roumen, Director “Leiden 400”, is joined by Marika Hoogduin, Art History and City Guide, as we continue our four nation, England, Netherlands, United States and Wampanoag, Mayflower 400 virtual tour of Leiden, Holland.

Join me in the inaugural virtual tour of the Mayflower 400-Leiden exhibit at the“Museum De Lakenhal.” The exhibit is still under installation. The museum is one of the sponsors of Mayflower 400-Leiden. The displays are in two languages, Dutch and English, taking the Pilgrims journey from England in 1609 to the New World in 1620.

The next leg of the Pilgrims journey was to America. They took boats up the river canals to Delfs Harbor where they boarded the Speedwell. Then the Mayflower. The Freedom to America Exhibits display life when they arrived in America. The Native Americans did not approach them for a few months. They stayed back and observed. Once interaction began there was trade between peoples. Beaver and deer pelts were used to make hats and clothes. The Beaver hats were popular in  England and Holland. The pilgrims needed ways to make money to repay the investors for the expensive journey to America. Jori Zjimans- Creator History Museum De Lakenhal, explains that for each hat made two beavers were needed. Within fifty years the beaver was almost extinct. The pilgrims sold 20,000 hats a year to England alone.

Beaver Hats were the Fashion of the time

The exhibit honors the end of the first harvest thanksgiving. A quote: “Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling so that we rejoice the fruit of our labors. Amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming among us, and among the rest their great king Massasoit, with some ninety men. For three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer. 1623-Edward Winslow/William Bradford

First Thanksgiving

There were more Native Americans than Pilgrims at the first Thanksgiving. It wasn’t until the 19th Century the romanticized version of the first Thanksgiving became a National Holiday about the origins of America. In the 1970’s Thanksgiving also became a National Day of Mourning reflecting the Native Americans discrimination and massacre. 

As you leave the exhibit through the “Corridor of Reflection,” it provides the opportunity to think about what Liberty is? There are poems, Words of expression and feelings about what Liberty is. What cost is Liberty. Then and now. How our nation was founded. How we grew as a nation. How we will grow as a nation in the future. 

The Exhibit opens to the public  June 2, 2020 until September 2020.

Reflection Wall

Reflection Wall Corridor -NorthernLights

Refugee-Colonist-Human-Choice-Borders-Leiden-Universal-Me, are just a few of the words. 

“Almost four centuries after the Mayflower set sail, the world is still  full of the pilgrims.” Barack Obama

We will journey along the streets of Leiden in my new blog post. The beautiful canals of Leiden. We will learn a little about the city the pilgrims lived in for twelve years. Did you know that during the 17th, that Leiden was considered the Beer Capital? Beer was the only thing you could safely drink. Men, Women and children all enjoyed the beer. It was a lower percentage of alcohol at that time. Water of the time was not safe to drink. 

A Leiden canal

Source:

Leiden 400 Virtual, Mayflower400 UK Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/Mayflower400UK/videos/515258389407633/?v=297663821229983&notif_id=1589822198004787&notif_t=live_video_explicit ,accessed 16 May 2020, video mark 1.81.78-2.34.20

Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 4

Leiden400-opening

“Museum De Lakenhal” (part 4)

I hope you enjoyed Part 1 and Part 2 of Mayflower 400 Leiden virtual journey. Click here to see Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 1, Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 2 here.  Click here to see Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 3

I was granted permission to take screen captures during the virtual tour. Our host, Michael Roumen, Director “Leiden 400”, is joined by Marika Hoogduin, Art History and City Guide, as we continue our four nation, England, Netherlands, United States and Wampanoag, Mayflower 400 virtual tour of Leiden, Holland.

Join me in the inaugural virtual tour of the Mayflower 400-Leiden exhibit at the“Museum De Lakenhal.” The exhibit is still under installation. The museum is one of the sponsors of Mayflower 400-Leiden. The displays are in two languages, Dutch and English, taking the Pilgrims journey from England in 1609 to the New World in 1620.

Pilgrims To America-Limits of Freedom

I feel the anguish, struggles, their way of life and pilgrims’ strength as they journeyed from England to the Netherlands and finally decided to leave for the New World. Join  and me on the “Pilgrims to America-And the Limits of Freedom Exhibit.”

King James I

Their journey begins by fleeing from the persecution of King James I. Taking them first to Port Delfshaven, Netherlands, then onto Leiden. They chose the Netherlands because it was a Protestant county. William Bradford was familiar with Holland from previous trips with the Ambassador of England in 1585.

Ordinary People Tiles

John Robinson was granted permission by Amsterdam to bring men, women and children to Leiden. Liden, The City of tolerance. These tiles depict ordinary people of the time of the Pilgrims.

Jacob van Swanenburg -Textile Workers 1607-1612

Jacob van Swanenburg-Painting of Textile workers 1607-1612. William Bradford was a weaver, the pilgrim families (men, women and children) worked from their homes, spinning, pulling, dying the cloth. 

The Freedom Exhibit shows many pieces of artwork about the time of the Pilgrims. Quotes from William Bradford’s journal and John Robinson are also seen throughout the exhibit. I think the most exciting part of the exhibit is the depiction of their life in Leiden, Textiles, printing, typesetting, pamphlets, where they lived, and how they lived. 

William Brewster, assisted by Edward Winslow and investor William Brewer, would smuggle pamphlets in the false bottoms of Barrels, to Scotland and England. Feeling unsafe in Leiden by this time was one of the reasons the pilgrims wanted to flee to the New World. Another reason would be the enticement of travel journals by John Smith, about the New World. Living to exist, hard work, and difficult times, they felt they had nothing to lose by seeking new opportunities in the New World.

False Bottom Barrels

One third of the pilgrims left. Two thirds remain behind. Some couldn’t afford to go. Others were scholars at the University and decided to become part of the community they lived in.

The four Reflection Houses are located throughout the exhibit. 

Can I Be Who I Am? Do I Stay Or Do I Go? Do I Dare To Start A New Life? and,  Your Freedom or My Freedom? Are the Reflection House themes. Universal themes that still resonate today.

William Mullins Shoes

Some artifacts of what the pilgrims brought to the new world are on display. William Mullins even brought 80 pairs of shoes. No one knows why he did. 

A 1620 painting by Adam Willaerts, of the pilgrims departure from Delfs Harbor, Netherlands. Next to the painting is a quote by William Bradford 1651, “The place they fixed their thoughts upon was somewhere in the vast and unpopulated countries of America.”

Delfs Harbor, Netherlands

Pilgrims Departure Delfs Harbor Netherlands

I will stop her for today. The exhibit offers much of the Pilgrims history. I don’t want to overwhelm you. 

Come back for Part 5 of the Limits of Freedom Exhibit- Mayflower 400 blog post.

 

Source:

Leiden 400 Virtual, Mayflower400 UK Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/Mayflower400UK/videos/515258389407633/?v=297663821229983&notif_id=1589822198004787&notif_t=live_video_explicit ,accessed 16 May 2020, video mark 1.81.78-2.43.20

 

Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 3

I hope you enjoyed Part 1 and Part 2 of Mayflower 400 Leiden virtual journey. Click here to see Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 1 Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 2 here.

I was granted permission to take screen captures during the virtual tour. Our host, Michael Roumen, Director “Leiden 400”, is joined by Marika Hoogduin, Art History and City Guide, as we continue our four nation, England, Netherlands, United States and Wampanoag, Mayflower 400 virtual tour of Leiden, Holland.

Marika Hoogduin, Art History and City Guide Joins Michael at the Windmill

Marika tells us about the arrival of the Pilgrim’s in 1609. They most likely saw the windmill shown in the drawing (1618), as they approached Leiden. You can see the base of the windmill [currently a Museum], as it is today behind Marika and Michael. The miller lived in the base of the windmill. The image also shows  the defense wall surrounding the windmill. The city center usually hosted an Animal market until the 1960’s, selling lambs and cattle. The area they are standing on was bombed in World War II. Renovations were made to this area providing our current view.

aula Peters-Member of Wampanoag Advisory “Committee to Plymouth400,

Paula Peters-Member of the Wampanoag Advisory “Committee to Plymouth400, speaks about her participation in Mayflower 400 commemoration.  She brings to the foreground a less romanticized version of the Pilgrims’ Mayflower voyage. She speaks about colonization of Indegenious people around the world. Colonization, Oppression, Assimilation and Death were minimized in the past. “Fifty years ago a National Movement of Activism by Native American tribes across America demanded to be recognized Historically, Culturally and as vital    Sovereign peoples. Today being a full partner in Mayflower400 commemoration is a major milestone. The telling of the full story told in the Wampanoag voice, provides balance to history and future generations.”

Museum De Lakenha

Jori Zijlmans-Creator History “Museum De Lakenhal,” will be our guide at our next stop. Let us now visit the Museum De Lakenhal, to learn about 17th Century textile manufacturing in the time of the Pilgrims. 

Textile Workers

The carvings on the exterior of the museum show the different aspects of textile work.done in the building during the 17th century. It became a museum of Fine Arts and History in 1870. Inspecting the cloth, a heavy woven wool, that was expensive at that time. Most of the Pilgrims family would most likely work at home weaving (Men), spinning (Women), wool combing (Children), dying and shaving the thick material. Pilgrims were not able to afford it. Leiden, of the time, was the largest textile industry, exporting all over the world. 

The museum houses some Rembrandt paintings. A fourteen year old Rembrandt lived, went to Latin School and learned to paint in Leiden. He would be roaming the streets of Leiden at the same time as the Pilgrims. 

My next blog post we will take us on the inaugural virtual tour of the Mayflower400-Leiden exhibit at the museum. The exhibit is still under installation. The museum is one of the sponsors of Mayflower400-Leiden. The displays are in two languages, Dutch and English, taking the Pilgrims journey from England in 1609 to the New World in 1620.

 

Source:

Leiden 400 Virtual, Mayflower400 UK Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/Mayflower400UK/videos/515258389407633/?v=297663821229983&notif_id=1589822198004787&notif_t=live_video_explicit ,accessed 16 May 2020, video mark1:30.16 – 1.81.78

If you are interested in more information on:

17th Century Textiles click here The Dutch Economy in the Golden Age (16th – 17th Centuries)

Who are the Wampanoag? Click here

Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 2

I hope you enjoyed Part 1 of Mayflower 400 virtual journey. Click here to see Mayflower 400 Leiden Part 1.

One of the things I liked about the virtual journey is the insertion of video clips from each of the Nations “coordinators”, for lack of a better word. The clips were shown as Michael Roumen, Director “Leiden 400” proceeded to the next stop. They talked about why each nation joined the Mayflower 400. Click on Mayflower 400  for the four hour virtual tour that includes those clips. It was not just about the Pilgrims’ journey from England, to the Netherlands, to America. It was about Freedom, Obsession and Migration. For the first time in celebration the Wampanoag Nation is also being recognized. 

 

Let us continue this four nation, England, Netherlands, United States and Wampanoag, virtual tour of Leiden, Holland, with a time of Reflection and Ponderance.

Why would the Pilgrims leave their mother country? England in 1609, the year the English born  men, women and children, left was a Catholic Sovereign nation under James the 1st. They were of the Protestant faith, not allowed to practice it for the past six years. Since James 1, son of Mary, Queen of Scots became King of England in 1603. Most likely they started to question themselves. 

The NorthernLight exhibition at the “Museum De Lakenhal,” provides an opportunity for Reflection of then and now..I’m going to let you ponder these questions from the exhibition, before I proceed with our Mayflower 400-Leiden tour in my next blog post.

Can I Be Who I Am?

Can I Be Who I Am? Is just appropriate in today’s society of World Wide COVID-19 Pandemic as it was for those travelers to be in 1609.

Do I Stay Or Do I Go?

In 1609, Do I leave my family, friends, and home to go where I can be me.

In Today’s world, Do I venture to the store, a restaurant and to a friend’s home and risk the chance of getting COVID-19. A virus that might not kill me, but someone I love I transferred it to.

Do I Dare To Start A New Life?

In 1609, it was a choice of starting a new life in a strange land.

In Today’s world, it is more about proceeding forward in a different lifestyle than before the pandemic.

Your Freedom Or My Freedom?

In 1609, it was about, not only religious freedom, but freedom of the “populated” country they journeyed to. It was not un-popluated as they thought.

In Today’s world, it is more about what is our freedom? Consider Life or Death of each other.

Is there really much difference between 1609 and today? I’m not talking about technology. I’m talking about people. How they think. How they act. How they proceed in life.

Please take time to reflect on then and now. I will be back with more of the Mayflower 400 -Leiden virtual tour in Blog post 3, with our host, Michael Roumen, Director “Leiden 400” and Jori Zijlmans- Curator History “Museum De Lakenhal.”

 

Source:

Leiden 400 Virtual, Mayflower400 UK Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/Mayflower400UK/videos/515258389407633/?v=297663821229983&notif_id=1589822198004787&notif_t=live_video_explicit ,accessed 16 May 2020, 

Mayflower 400 Leiden Virtual Tour Part 1

Mayflower 400 Leiden Virtual Tour 

On 16 May 2020, I was lucky enough to join people across the world on a virtual Pilgrimage through Leiden, Holland cobblestone pathways. A World-wide Pandemic turned an in person tour of Leiden, the pilgrims’ home for twelve years (1609-1620), to a Facebook Live four hour tour with over 30,000 viewers. A huge Thank you to Marileen Dogterom [I hope it is the correct name] the coordinator of the Leiden 400 virtual tour.

I was granted permission to take screen captures during the virtual tour. Please join me and our guide, Michael Roumen, Director “Leiden 400”, in a series of blog posts about our Mayflower Pilgrims stay in Leiden.

 

Marileen Dogterom and Michael Roumen

I decided to start our four nation commemoration of Freedom, Oppression and Migration by the Netherlands, United Kingdom, United States and the Wampanoag Nation, with the Wampanoag culture display at the World Museum [Museum Volkenkunde.]

First People by Yakita Fields

Liesbeth Ouwehand, Curator Photography, “Museum Volkenkunde” explains the First People creations by contemporary artists.

The “Museum Volkenkunde” is part of the National Museum of World Culture. It is the oldest of the museums founded in 1837.

“History Of The World”

There are four photographs called “History of the World” by Shelley Niro. They are oblong framed pieces; each panel shows Land, Air and Water. The color of the frames, Red, Yellow, White, Black, represents the scared directions . Above is the Red framed photograph. 

Our tour continues with the Wampanoag culture with one of the photographs by Cara Romero called “Julia.” There are three different women standing in different boxes, showing the cultural diversity of the Indigenous people of North America. Below is just one of those photographs. A confident woman in traditional dress surrounded by cultural items.

“Julia” by Cara Romero

We leave Lisbeth to join Henrietta Lidchi, Chief Curator “Museum Volkenkunde” Exhibition video about honoring the Resilience and  creativity of Indigenous people. The exhibition displays Athletics, Pottery, Weaponry, Wampum, Photography and Fashion.

Henrietta Lidchi, Chief Curator “Museum Volkenkunde”

In respecting the exhibitions, I’m only posting a few screen captures of what the exhibition has to offer. My goal in this post was to give thanks to the work of those that are bringing this, now virtual tour, to us. The emotions I feel in just the first hour, of this four hour tour, is overwhelming.  The First Americans Exhibit provided me with a reminder that all actions have consequences. The pilgrims did not go to an uninhabited place. There were sad consequences to that journey. Both for Indeginous people and the Pilgrims. 

I think the fact that all four nations, Dutch, English, American and Wampanoag, joined together to commemorate and honor all people, affected by the Pilgrims journey 400 years ago speaks volumes. The Pilgrim’s journey is about Freedom, Oppression, and Migrations, starting in England in 1609 to 1647. Yes, 1647 was when the last of the Leiden Pilgrims, who migrated to the New World, came aboard the “Fortune.” Not all those who left England to the Netherlands, decided to journey on. The 1620 Mayflower journey is a story we need to revisit. To understand the consequences of that journey to all nations, not just the Pilgrims point of view.

I will talk about the Pilgrim’s journey in future blog posts. 

Source:

Leiden 400 Virtual, Mayflower400 UK Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/Mayflower400UK/videos/515258389407633/?v=297663821229983&notif_id=1589822198004787&notif_t=live_video_explicit ,accessed 16 May 2020, video mark 0-1:30.16.

What Do I Look Like?

June Stearns Butka and Tyna Butka

I’m participating in the “Book of Me-2018 Series.”  Five prompts are given monthly by Julie Goucher of Anglers Rest. You can see her monthly prompts and earlier posts HERE.

This is my second prompt for January 2018. You can see my previous “The Book of Me” series posts HERE .

What do I look like?

You would think this would be an easy prompt. Just give a description of yourself. Five feet three and half inches tall; more of an apple shaped body than pear; dark blonde hair with graying highlights; fair complexion; blue eyes; pleasant smile and smooth skin with freckles, age spots and skin tags.  My weight ranges between 200 and 211 pounds. I just can’t break that 200 mark. I will keep trying.

That is the physical description of me as I am today. That’s fine, yet it does not tell me how others see me as or what I looked liked over the years.

June-Who Am I? What Do You See?

Here is a photo collage of me from 1954-2018.

June Stearns Butka

I’ve had many looks over the years from no hair (after chemo,) wigs for those times, short hair, curly hair, buttercup blonde to sandy blonde/brown, straight hair, curly hair, even a brunette and a redhead with my wigs. I embraced each “me” that I was.

I posted a request on Facebook asking how my friends and family see me. I will update this post if I get any response as to how others see me.