Johann Lawyer-The Immigrant

Johann Lawyer-the Immigrant

The History of Herkimer County, New York mentions the early immigrants as “German Palatines”, which were driven out of their home by religious persecution. They first went to London, then to America. The term “”German Palatinate” was used to describe the large second and third immigration to America (late 1600’-early 1700’s). A large part of the later immigration were from Southwestern Germany, Alsace and the Netherlands.

The thirty Year War under King Louis XIV, created cruel living conditions for these long suffering people. Yet, when they arrived to America the conditions were not different. Many were put into apprenticeships almost like slavery under the Colonial Governor. These dissolute, uneducated people decided to remove themselves to Schohaire Valley in New York. Finally life began to improve for them.

The Herkimer County, New York history goes on to mention that almost all the original settlers of Stone Arabia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palatine,_New_York) , came over in 1710 from Germany known as Duchy of Hesse-Nassau.

Johann Lawyer, along with John Christian Gerlach, William York, Johann and Hendrick Frey and Godfrey DeWulven petitioned for a tract of land that included a meadow and woods in Mohacks Country, between the Cayadutta and Canada Kill, 7th March 1722. A survey warrant was issued 1 November 1722, a license to purchase the next day and a deed from the Canajohaire Indians was obtained 19 October 1723.

Several of the original petitioners may have not journeyed to this new land, for they were not found in Stone Arabia records for the early years.

The information I obtained was from an Address by John B. Koetteritz of Little Falls, given to the Herkimer County Historical Society on 8 June 1897, honoring Andrew Finck, Major in the Revolutionary Wars. (https://archive.org/stream/papersreadbefore11herk#page/n326/mode/1up)

Johann Lawyer is the ancestor I am researching. His only mention in the papers was a part of the Petitioners. This gives me another clue where to look next for Johann Lawyer, aka John Lawyer of Schohaire County, New York.

POSSIBLE Descendants of Johann Lawyer (still under research verifying conflicting dates)

Johann Lawyer 1684-1762 and Elizabeth Otto1684-1760

Johannes Lawyer1725-1794 and Christina Sternberger 1732-1808

Johannes Lawyer 1751-1818 and Engel (Angelica) Schwart 1747-1834

Johannes Lawyer 1792-1836 and Ruth Allen 1799-

Following information form Family Bible

Addison Joseph Lawyer 1823-1851 and Mary Susanna Huntington 1827-1904

Mary Anna Lawyer 1856-1936 and Willard Durlin McKinstry 1850-1919

Edward Lawyer McKinstry 1897-1962 and Norma Haskell 1900-1942

Mary Alice McKinstry 1928-2011 and Private Information.

Johannes Lawyer Descendants

Johannes Lawyer Descendants

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Remembering Willard McKinstry

Willard McKinstry is remembered even in the year 2016 by his descendant Pamela Morey Okolita Sherrill.  Her email to me says it all

“Please share, and post. He was a newspaperman. This was published in the Fredonia Censor… 1 Feb 1899.”

A newspaper man that was revered by his colleagues, family, friends, and a society that was under Civil War. Willard McKinstry, to quote his great granddaughter, “Was an awesome role model, for sure.”

The following is a transcription of E. P. Cleveland’s address at Willard McKinstry’s funeral 29 Jan 1899. It was published in the Fredonia Censor 1 Feb 1899, Fredonia, Chautauque, New York.

Willard McKinstry Funeral Oratory

Willard McKinstry Funeral Oratory

Rev. E. P. Cleveland’s address.

AT THE FUNERAL SERVICE FOR WILLARD MCKINSTRY, IN THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, FREDONIA, JANUARY 29, 1899.

When a good man dies, who for more than half a century has exercised a formative influence upon the thought and life of a community, it is both fitting and profitable for the living to do honor to his memory by laying emphasis upon those strong traits in his character that may help to explain the high place that he held in the public esteem, and the wholesome influence that it was his privilege to exercise. No small part of the secret of such a man’s character and achievements must be sought for in that spiritual legacy that he received at birth from a worthy and godly ancestry; and as we unite this afternoon in paying a tribute of respect and love to our beloved friend, Willard McKinstry, I ask you to consider briefly that sturdy ancestry from which he sprang.

Probably you all know that he was of Scotch extraction. His great-great-grandfather, Roger McKinstry, was living near the city of Edinburgh when the religious persecutions arose under Charles II, and he was compelled, in the year 1669, in order that he might secure that religious liberty and that independence of thought and conscience which are so dear to the true Scot, to remove to the province of Ulster, Ireland. There, in the county of Antrim, Mr. McKinstry’s great-grandfather, John McKinstry, was born in the year 1677. This young man went back to the land of his birth for his education and was graduated with the degree of Master of Arts from the University of Edinburgh. He was educated and ordained for the Presbyterian ministry, and in the year 1718 sailed to America, and settled in Worcester County, Mass. He was pastor during all of his active life over Congregational churches in Massachusetts and Connecticut. Mr. McKinstry’s grandfather was born in Worcester County, Mass., was graduated at Yale College in 1746, and was ordained in 1752 as the first pastor of the Second Congregational Church of Springfield, now in Chicopee, Mass. He continued in this relation, either as active pastor or as pastor emeritus, during all of his long life. He is described, and I think that we shall recognize the family likeness, “as having been a man of exemplary piety, of a candid spirit, of a modest and humble disposition.”

Willard McKinstry, the seventh of eleven children of Perseus McKinstry and Grace Williams was born at Chicopee, Mass., on May 9th, 1815. His early life was spent on his father’s farm. His father died when he was 14 years of age, and at the age of 16 he, in company with two other young men, became apprenticed in the office of the Northampton Courier to learn the printer’s trade. These three young men were ambitious for learning, and eagerly embraced every opportunity for acquiring useful information, and for the buying and reading of good books. They were indeed destined in a remarkable way to magnify and adorn their chosen profession, following it through life; and to-day the last of the trio, Mr. Prat, of Watertown Times, is bearing no small part of the grief incident to this sad occasion. [Paper torn here] _e first break in this little circle of ___g friends was made by the ______ Brockaway, the late edi__ __tertown Times.[editor of the Watertown times]. In an ex_____ ____nching tribute to Mr. _____ ____lished in the editorial _____ _____ Watertown Times on ______ Pratt says of him, at _____ ______f his apprenticeship, _____ _____ or 17 years of age: _____ __der than writer,_____ [blanks due to torn paper.]

Seemingly intelligent beyond his years, remarkably sedate in demeanor and serious in conversation, and never frivolous in conduct or speech, he made an early and deep impression on his then youthful associate-apprentice, which ripened and solidified into a life-long friendship that has known no estrangement or abatement in all the intervening sixty odd years.”

After working as a journeyman printer in the cities of New York and Hartford, and for three years in the famous publishing house of the Merriams, in Springfield, the publishers of Webster’s Dictionary, he came in 1839 to Chautauqua County, and in 1842 to Fredonia upon purchase of the Censor. Of the details of his career since he came to this village, where for more than half a century his life has been known and read of all men, I need not speak. We all may recall the stirring and critical events in our national history through which he passed, and in which he bore a part as an editorial writer of ability and of earnest and honest convictions. The Mexican War and the territorial expansion resulting therefrom, the Civil War and the wiping out of the curse of African slavery, the reconstruction of the South after the war, and all questions deeply affecting the public weal which have come up during the last fifty years, engaged his deep and serious interest. He enjoyed the confidence and friendship of such leaders of public opinion as Thurlow Weed and Horace Greely, and was regarded by them as one upon whom they could count for great things in the battle for human rights and for the preservation of the Union, and they were not disappointed. His interest in public events was not political, but patriotic, and he gave practical evidence of his patriotism and of his board Christian philanthropy as well, by going to the front during our Civil War, under the auspices of Christian Commission and engaging in the work of caring for wounded and dying soldiers. In all his public and private life he exhibited that absolute integrity which belonged to his Scotch him, and to which he tenaciously adhered as one of his most cherished principles. No true Scotchman like Mr. McKinstry can be accused of ever having lacked the courage of his convictions, but yet his uncompromising character did not make him and enemies. He was magnanimous in his treatment of those with whom he differed. I have heard him tell with satisfaction and delight how grandly on of his friends, to whom he was radically opposed in politics, rose to the demands of a great occasion in the eulogy that he pronounced upon Gen. Grant.

There is not time this afternoon to speak of all the strong points in Mr. McKinstry’s character; but there are a few that deserve to be specially emphasized. The first of these is his strong democratic principles and sympathies. I suspect that he did not greatly reverence that nobility which is determined only by blood. To him the only true nobility was nobility of character. He could endorse heartily the familiar sentiment of Burns:

“The rank is but the guinea-stamp, The man’s the gowd for a’ that.”

And this also from Tennyson:

“Plowmen, shepherd, have I found, and more

Than once, and still could find,

Sons of God, and Kings of men in utter nobleness of mind.

Here and there a cotter’s babe is royal born by right divine:

Here and there my lord is lower than his oxen or swine.”

 

He had a hearty contempt for that cheap aristocracy, sometimes found in this country that seemed to him to be utterly at variance with national character and institutions. He felt, with Lincoln, that God must love the common people or He would not have made so many of them. And in this intense sympathy with those that make up the great body of society he felt that he was in harmony with the spirit of Him whose words the common people heard gladly. The legend that stood out in letter of iron o the front of the press on which the CENSOR was originally printed, expressed a sentiment with which Mr. McKinstry was in the heartiest accord: “A Free Press. The Tyrant’s Foe; the People’s Friend.”

But there is one thing that I am sure Mr. McKinstry would rather have said of him to-day than almost anything else that could be said. That is, he was ever the friend of the down trodden and oppressed. Nothing else could rouse his indignation as a tale of oppression or wrong. This trait in his character was the secret of his intense moral enthusiasm in the interests of the abolition of African slavery. He was the black man’s friend, however, not only before but also after he was set free. He made generous donations every year to the American Missionary Association for educational work among the freedmen of the South, and it was only two years ago that by a donation of #30 to this society he constituted his pastor a life member of it. But these glowing words from Mr. McKinstry’s own pen reveal his sympathy with the oppressed more clearly than can any words of mine. In his editorial on “The modern Martyr Age,” published over 30 years ago, he said: “Of all the martyrs of this century, none may wear a brighter crown than those who made such great sacrifices for the benefit of a helpless and oppressed people, who for 200 years had worn the shackles of slavery. When such men as Gerrit Smith and Wendell Phillips, cradled in affluence and surrounded with a;; the comforts which wealth can give, devote their great talents, time and wealth in behalf of the down trodden and oppressed-such men as Garrison, Lundy and John Brown, the noblest martyr of the century—and scores of others, who gave themselves to the cause of a people who were helpless in themselves, and struck hard blows for those who could make no return but their gratitude, such men will wear the martyr’s crown, and the brightest pages of history will herald their praise, and the richest breathings of poetry will perpetuate their renown.” During almost the last call that made upon Mr. McKinstry, only a few days since, he spoke with a glow of enthusiasm, his rugged features radiant with that benignant smile that all his friends knew so well, of the monument in Washington, erected to the memory of Abraham Lincoln, representing the emancipated slaves kneeling amid their broken shackles at the feet of their deliverer, expressing gratitude for their freedom, and he felt and said that no grander monument had ever been erected.

Still another characteristic of Mr. McKinstry was his open mindedness; his readiness to accept truth from whatsoever quarter it might come. I do not mean by this that he was inclined to take up with present-day, so-called liberal fads, or to chase intellectual will-o’-the-wisps. He had too much good strong common sense for that. I simply mean that he believed in truth and in its invincibility. He believed that true progress consists in the discovery of new truth, or of old truth newly discerned, and that it is our duty ever to be struggling towards light. It is remarkable that at an age when most men become conservative, his tendency was toward broader views of truth and more tolerant spirit. He was already well advanced in years when, writing to one who he hoped would become his pastor, of the temper of the church to which he belonged, he said: “We believe that not all the light which has come into the world has been exhausted. “The world moves’ and no earthly power can stop it.” The statement that his mind was in an unusual degree open to the reception of truth is still further justified by his own closing words in his lecture on “The weapons of truth are not those of war and bloodshed. It asks no penal statues for its protection, though hecatombs of victims have been offered at its shrine when the arm of political power has been arrayed against it. ‘Let truth and error grapple,’ only let the field of contest be free and open and we need not fear the results. ‘The toleration of error is safe, if truth is left free and unrestrained action. Let the schoolmaster be sent abroad to develop and awaken its latent powers, and the press teem with new thoughts, thrown forth for examination and investigation. Let the mind be free, and we cannot be slaves. He whose soul is in bondage to his passions and prejudices is most abject of slaves. Then let us cherish freedom of the mind as the basis of civil and religious liberty-ever remembering that he whom the truth makes free is free indeed.” It was this trait that gave him his hopeful view of life. He had little use for pessimism or pessimists. He looked not backward but forward. He believed that the golden age is yet to be.

But any attempted sketch of Mr. McKinstry’s character would be strongly incomplete, if emphasis were laid upon that which was his crowning glory and the secret of his usefulness and nobility of life. I refer to his simple religious faith. When but 14 years of age he joined the church to which his grandfather had preached long before he was born. He joined the Presbyterian Church in this village in the 1848, and was for 45 years one of its ruling elders. During all his life, until within the last two years, when his feeble health would not permit, he was identified with the Sunday-school. In this church his presence was a tower of strength. The simplicity and child-like confidence of his faith made those of us who heard him speak and pray and saw him live, turn with greater simplicity and devotion to his God and ours. I remember the dep emotion with which Mr. McKinstry, within the last year, at the funeral of a friend, listened to this illustration of Christian confidence: One of Garribaldi’s generals had suddenly been ordered to advance. Some of his subordinates asked him: “Where are we going?” The general replied: “I don’t know, but Garribaldi knows.” Was it not this same Christian confidence that led our venerated friend and brother to answer the surnames of his Divine Master, and to breathe as his final prayer of praise in this world, the last words that ever fell from his lips, “WE THANK THEE, HEAVENLY FATHER.”

 

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Happy Father’s Day

This may be listed as 85th day of #365daysofjune85, it is actually, 19 June 2016,  a very special day for all the father’s in my life.

The Stearns Family 1972

The Stearns Family 1972

This photo of our family shows the start of a new generation of parents to be. [I’m taking the photo.]

Happy Father’s Day to:

Nelson William Stearns, my father [I miss you daily]

Michael D. Butka, my husband

Michael J. Butka, my son

David M. Levesque, my nephew

Christopher L. Stevenson, my nephew

Nelson N. Stearns, my brother [the only boy in the photo above]

Sean Emerson, my grand nephew’s father

May you all enjoy your day making many happy memories!

 

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Remembering those who Served from Sutton, New Hampshire

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Remembering those who died in the service of our county from Sutton, Merrimack, New Hampshire.

I honor and respect their courage to stand ground, giving the ultimate sacrifice for our country.

Civil War 1861-1865

George B. Barnard Calvary [notation on memorial first killed in battle]

World War I

Pvt. Ray B. Nelson

Pvt. Ray B. Nelson 1896-1918

Pvt. Ray Brenton Nelson was my paternal Grand Uncle. He enlisted 14 Aug, 1918 and died at Fortress Monroe 20 Nov 1918.

 

World War  II

1941 – 1945

In honor of those from Sutton New Hampshire who served in World War II

*Willis W Hill Jr.

*Thomas E Johnson

*Edward Loughery

*Clarence K Willey

* Died in service

 

 

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Mayflower II at Mystic Seaport Museum

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Mayflower II

Mayflower II

I recently was invited to view the Mayflower II, currently under renovation at the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, at Mystic Seaport Museum, Mystic Seaport, Connecticut.

I’m grateful for the invitation from fellow Geneablogger, Heather Wilkinson Rojo, of Nutfield Genealogy Blog. She and her husband Vincent, kindly became my guide and chauffeur for the day. I had not seen either the Mayflower or Mystic in decades. The day turn out beautiful in weather [a few showers,] learning opportunities and overall enjoyment of each others company.

Heather has written a wonderful overview of the Mayflower preservation efforts on her blog site, Nutfield Genealogy. I will not duplicate her efforts.

Vincent and Heather Wilkinson Rojo

Vincent and Heather Wilkinson Rojo

After a warm welcome in the Vistor’s Center we met up with the Plimoth Plantation staff, our host for the day, we proceeded to the Shipyard. While listening to the presentation about their preservation work, I turned around and saw the Mayflower II. Feelings of longing came over me. I still need to find the reported direct line ancestor to the Mayflower. I have found many cousin lines, but sadly, not my direct line.

Mayflower II: My first look

Mayflower II: My first look

Mayflower II: another look

Mayflower II: another look

The Mayflower II welcomed us like old friends.

Heather and Vincent boarding the Mayflower

Heather and Vincent boarding the Mayflower

There is a beautiful view from the Mayflower II of Mystic

View from the Mayflower II

View from the Mayflower II

The preservation crew use old and new style tools in the renovations.

Tools

Tools

"Tween" Deck 1

“Tween” Deck 1

"Tween" Deck 2

“Tween” Deck 2

The “tween” deck, also known as the gun deck, offers a view of how the Pilgrims lived. Imagine 102 cooking, all the passengers and crew quarters, their belongings, and animals living and the gun in one small space. [They had more room than those aboard the “Arbella” with 125 passengers, and a smaller vessel. This was one of the ships my ancestors came over on ten years later.]

Cooking aboard ship

Cooking aboard ship

The Cooking area is being used for storage during renovations.

Gun Ports

Gun Ports

The gun ports were numbered.

canon

The gun room is located where you saw the Emblem in the photograph above [Mayflower II another look.]

Whit Perry gave a very informative overview of the Mayflower and the Mayflower II.

Whit Perry

Whit Perry

Whit Perry is the director of maritime preservation and operations. He is giving an overview of his crew on the days restoration and work projects.

Windlass

Windlass

Capstan

Capstan

The Capstan [circular log sharped column in the center of the ship. You can see some of the new live oak boards for needed repairs to the Mayflower II. The haven’t seasoned, yet, to the dark shade you see on the older boards around the ship.

The cargo hold was below the “Tween” Deck via a cargo hold hatch.

Cargo Hold

Cargo Hold

Fore Mast

Fore Mast

To see more views and cut a way views of the Mayflower visit this page “The Mayflower Voyage.” It describes what the ship better than I can is words.

Live Oak from South Carolina 600 years old

Live Oak from South Carolina 600 years old

Live oak history

Live oak history

What is ‘live oak”? Why is it so important in the preservation of the Mayflower II [and even in restoring “Old Ironside.”]?

Richard Pickering, Deputy Executive Director of Plimoth Plantation, tells us that live oak is one of the reasons the restorations take so long to complete. They need to find the Live Oak trees in a size that can accommodate the making of new boards for the Mayflower. This keeps the authenticity of the ship by doing so. It is an ongoing global search to fine them.

Richard Pickering Heather Wilkson Rojo and Vincent Rojo

Richard Pickering Heather Wilkson Rojo and Vincent Rojo

If truly curious:

Please visit:

Heather Wilkson Rojo’s Blog posts about the Mayflower II in dry dock, and her most recent post “The Mayflower II under renovation at the Mystic Seaport shipyard,”

Plimoth Plantation’s website about the Mayflower II,

Watch the Mystic Seaport video of the Mayflower II restoration,

To donate to the Mayflower restoration project go the “The Mayflower II Restoration” web page,

Click on the links embedded in my blog post such as; live oak, the Mayflower cross view and a few others.

I hope the pictorial narrative helps you in better understanding the efforts put into preserving a national monument, The Mayflower II.” It is important that we save our heritage. many building, covered bridges and building have been lost more to decay and neglect, than to any other cause.

Thank you Heather Wilkinson Rojo and Vincent Rojo for you photography, invitation and pleasant company for our day at Mystic Seaport Museum/Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard.

Published under creative common license

June Stearns Butka, “Mayflower II at Mystic Seaport Museum,” Damegussie Genealogy Rants, posted 12 May 2016, https://damegussie.wordpress.com/?p=2220&preview=true: (accessed 12 May 2016.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Week of Remembering Mom and Dad- Day 5

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This week I have been honoring my parents, Nelson Stearns and Shirley Pease Stearns, with the remembrance of the Model T Cookie Jar and recipes it cherish and kept for us over the years.

IMG_4516

I’m the eldest of a baker’s dozen with six of us still living. We always had turns in choosing what cookies where being made. When old enough we would bake them with Mom or it was our turn to do the baking. I loved the many happy memories created during those special baking days. Some days the baking was with my Aunt Eleanor [Stearns Duncan], my dad’s sister and my great Aunt Carrie [Lulu Carrie Stearns Perkins], his dad’s sister.

I first learned to cook and bake on a wood stove, graduated to gas and in later years electric. Each type of stove required recipe adjustments for baking at the correct temperature. Many attempts resulted in burned or uncooked cookies. The burnt cookies were feed to the livestock. The under cooked was either re-baked, if possible or layered with pudding. Nothing was wasted in our household.

Today I close the series with the No Bake Cookies, my brother, Nelson Neal Stearns liked.

Here is an overview of this weeks recipes. The Hermits/Soft Molasses Cookies were the favorite of my Dads, Nelson; my sisters Marjorie [Stearns Stevenson] and Eleanor [Stearns Carne] and one of my choices. [I liked variety. If it was my turn to cook and bake I would choose a new recipe to make. Some were kept for later use and others recipes were discarded. Those were not a big hit with anyone.] My sisters Vickie [Stearns Levesque Junkins], Susan [Stearns Aeschliman] and Eleanor (second choice) liked the Toll House cookies.

I honored my mother’s death anniversary with the cookies she found comfort in those last days of her life, Applesauce/Pumpkin Cookies.

I honored my father’s birthday month with his favorite recipe, that was not a cookie, the Model T Cookie Jar held, Biscuits.

Pleasure from the Good Earth cover

I can not find her handwritten recipes for the two no bake cookies mom made. I did find the type written ones in the cookbook that was created as a fundraiser for a charitable fund. The fund was absorbed into the Lou and Lutza Smith Fund when changes were made in how the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation manged their funds.

no bake cookies

Here is the first recipe: No Bake Chocolate Cookies

2 cups sugar

1/2 cup milk

1/2 cup butter

1/2 cup cocoa

3 cups oats

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/2 cup coconut

Mix sugar, milk, butter and cocoa together in a saucepan; cook 1 minute after butter melts. Add oats, vanilla and coconut. Drop by spoonful’s onto waxed paper. Let Cool. Enjoy.

no bake oatmeal cookies

Second recipe: No Bake Oatmeal Cookies

2 cups sugar

1/2 cup milk

1/2 butter

1/2 cup brown sugar

3 cups oats

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/2 cup raisins

In a saucepan combine sugar, brown sugar, milk and butter for 3 minutes after butter melts. Add oats, vanilla and raisins. Drop by spoonful’s onto waxed paper. Let Cool. Enjoy.

I hope that my sharing these happy memories bring back memories of your own. I look forward to reading about your journey into cooking with Mom, Dad or any loved one you share memories with.

 

 

 

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Happy 38th Anniversary Michael Daniel Butka

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Today I celebrate thirty eight years with the love of my life and heart, Michael Daniel Butka. This post concentrates our first year together.

Butka Stearns 1977-1978

This is a page from the scrapbook I created for my husband to celebrate our first twenty five years together. This one page is power packed with memories.

It tells the story in pictures of our first year together. I blogged previously about how we met.

Top photos above the “film strip”are:

The first Apartment we lived in as a couple, 44 Center Grove Road, Randolph, New Jersey. [We did share an apartment in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, with his roommate from April to June 1978, Michael moved to this apartment in June while I stayed with a friend on Pease Air Force Base until I graduated from New Hampshire vocational Technical School Practical Nurse program in August.]

Our first Christmas Tree purchased on the way home after spending our first Thanksgiving together with his family in Milford, Connecticut.

The “film strip photos include:

Starting at the top- Taking our vows with the Justice of the Peace in Kittery, Maine, 29 April 1978;

Michael’s family- father, Daniel Zigmund Butka (1928-1987); June Stearns Butka, Michael Daniel Butka; brother, Stephen Paul Butka (1958-2001,) sitting brother-in-law, Daniel DellaGioia and sister, Danielle Marie Butka DellaGioa. Michael’s mother, Loretta Dula Butka was unable to attend. She was caring for her ill mother, Francis Kotch Dula (1909-1986.) Photo taken by my father, Nelson William Stearns (1930-1988.) Photo taken at Sagamore Court Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

My family- June Stearns Butka, Nelson William Stearns (1930-1988) and Shirley Beatrice Pease Stearns (1935-2001.) Photo taken by my husband, Michael Daniel Butka on our wedding day at our Sagamore Court apartment.

Blank film strip was in the middle separating our wedding photos from our graduation photos from college.

Michael Daniel Butka graduation photo from New Hampshire Vocational College Technical School Drafting Program.

June Stearns Butka graduation program from New Hampshire Vocational College Technical School Practical Nursing Program.

The bottom photo is Atlantic City, where I took my Nursing State Board Exam.

Our first year together was amazing and eventful. We met in the fall of 1977 at a yearbook committee meeting. Started dating 23 Jan 1978. Married 29 April 1978. Graduated officially June 1978 [I stayed until August 1978 doing my community nursing internship at Pease Air Force base hospital.] We honeymooned in New York City and New Jersey while Michael was interviewing for a job at Bell Lab’s, Whippany, New Jersey. Michael moved first in June and I followed in August to 44 Center Grove Road, Randolph, New Jersey. We started our new jobs, Michael at Bell Labs Whippany in June and I started working in August for Dover General Hospital, Dover, New Jersey as an Floating Nurse until I passed my stated boards. I took my State boards in October and knew the result the week before Christmas. It was a very Happy Christmas, that year. Early in 1978 we found out we were pregnant with our first child [I had a miscarriage in early fall of 1977- in my first trimester.]

Our first year together was a roller coaster of life events, adjustment, lows and highs that provided a strong base, as a couple, for the years to come. Our love, respect, communication and support of each other in the good and bad times has never faulted.

I dedicated this post to the love of my life and heart, Michael Daniel Butka. Happy 38th Anniversary, Mike. I look forward to each and every day we have together. May there be many more years to share.

Love and Hugs,

Your loving wife, June.

 

 

 

 

 

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