Mayflower Serendipity Part 3

Mayflower Serendipity Part 3

I decided to do a synopsis instead of several longer post in my research process. My process is the same as I posted in Part 2 for the challenges. Why repeat what I have already stated for each person. My advice is for you to “Stay the Course” when you are researching you ancestors. Answer one question at a time. If you see something of interest for another question, put it in your “To Do” list with links and a brief note. Go back to the list when you are answering that ancestor’s question.

You my read Mayflower Serendipity Part 1 click here.

You may read Serendipity Part 2 click here.

 

This blog is all about that Genealogy Happy Dance we do. I’m sure you will feel the emotions I felt when you read this blog. I still get chills, even now, while I’m typing this post.

My second post provided you with my step by step approach to Familysearch.org Catalog search. That was the approach I used for the other ancestors I was searching. Elijah and Isaiah Pease still remained a challenge until…

Serendipity walked in the door. Maybe I should say, arrived via an Ancestry Message.

I received a message from a “cousin” line asking:

Cousin: “Is it possible Elijah was the parent of his Joseph?”

Me: “It is possible. He and Mary had 13 children, according to the History of Industry Maine. I haven’t found supporting documents to all those children.”

Cousin:  I have access to a Family Bible that listed Elijah as Joseph’s father, along with Elijah’s death.”

Me: “Are you willing to share the page.”

Cousin: Sent 6 pages with the Provence how the Bible was passed to each generation with the appropriate dates.

Now you know why the series is called Mayflower Serendipity. If it wasn’t for the Bible pages, I wouldn’t have known when Elijah or Mary died with supportive documentation.

 

I’m not sharing the Bible pages for Public Use. When my Mayflower Lineage Application is accepted. I will share that. Those who are descendants of Elijah Pease and Mary “Polly” Collins will have the opportunity to document your line from them.

 

I can with confidence state that Elijah Pease:

  1. born on Martha’s Vineyard in 1778 to Joseph Pease and Sarah Smith. Supported by Joseph Probate Will Records. Accessed via Ancestry.com for Joseph Pease. [No birth record found to date.]
  2. He married Polly Collins, 11 Apr 1805, Farmington, Franklin, Maine, Maine Marriage records, 1771-1907
  3. That I found supporting documents for 6 of the 13 children listed in the History of Industry Maine.
  4. That he resided in Farmington, Maine; New Sharon, Maine, Lexington, Maine on United States Census Records for New Sharon, marriage record for Farmington and, and Lexington per Industry History and Family Bible.
  5. Elijah Pease died within days of falling in a fire at Gilman Pond, Lexington, Maine, on 16 May 1823. Family Bible
  6. Mary, his wife, died 20 Mar 1833 in Lexington, Maine. Family Bible
  7. Family Bible page

    I will do a separate blog for Isaiah Pease and the challenges I met for him and his wife Abigail A. Bennet. It will be the last of this series. It may not pack the punch that this one does. It will show how I supported my conclusions of his connection to Elijah and Mary.

     

    I hope you are enjoying this series.

    Happy Family Researching.

     

    Sources:

    1. Maine, Wills and probate Records, 1584-1999, com. Maine, Wills and Probate Records, 1584-1999[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Original data: Maine County, District and Probate Courts. For Joseph Pease, https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/8994/005429518_00365/1743118?backurl=https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/86776289/person/48543206052/facts/citation/1040367141463/edit/record , last accessed 22 Apr 2018
    2. “Maine Marriages, 1771-1907,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F46F-N83 : 10 February 2018), Elijah Pease and Polly Collins, 11 Apr 1805; citing Farmington, Franklin, Maine, reference Vol 1 pg 39; FHL microfilm 10,865.
    3. A History of the town of Industry, Franklin County, Maine from the earliest settlement in 1787 down to present time, William Collins hatch, 1893 Press of knowlton, mcLeary & Co., Farmington, Maine, libray of congress americana collection, https://archive.org/details/historyoftownofi00hatc, last accessed 6 Apr 2018 p. 555 Genealogical Notes
    4. 1810 United States Census New Sharon, Kennebec, Maine for Elijah Pease, com. 1810 United States Federal Census[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
      Original data: Third Census of the United States, 1810. (NARA microfilm publication M252, 71 rolls). Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
    5. 1820 United States Census New Sharon, Kennebec, Maine for Elijah Pease, com. 1820 United States Federal Census[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
      Original data: Fourth Census of the United States, 1820. (NARA microfilm publication M33, 142 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
    6. Family Bible, Private Name, Private, ancestry message, E-ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE to June Butka Ancestry message, 2018 Apr 4, Elijah Pease and wife Mary, privately held by June Stearns Butka, E-ADRESS & STREET ADRESS FOR PRIVATE USE Merrimack, New Hampshire.
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Honoring Female Ancestors: Sarah A. Abbey

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Honoring Female Ancestors: Sarah A. Abbey

The month of March is Women History Month. I will be adding some of my female ancestors. in my blogs to honor the hard work that all the achievements small or large to our society. We may not know the full contributions our ancestors provide during their lifetime. We do know that those achievements are not always honored. I honor the achievements in each blog I do, male or female; you are remembered here.

Today’s honoree is: Sarah A. Abbey. Sarah is my 2nd great grandmother. Today’s record is her marriage to Benjamin F Hutchins  at age 20, Benjamin age 21, on 7 Sept 1866 by E. L. Russell, Minister of the Gospel in Wellington, Maine. Intentions were filed 20 Aug 1866. It gives the birthplace for Sarah as St. Albans, Maine. I have not found her birth record to date.

Abbey Sarah A b1846 marriage

Page two of Sarah’s marriage record provides information on her and Benjamin’s parents.

Abbey Sarah A b1846 marriage page2

Sarah’s parents listed as Calvin Abby born Green Maine and Flurentina Abby born Greene Maine. Benjamin’s parents are listed as Perkins Hutchins born New Portland Maine and Nancy Hutchins born Brighton Maine. The marriage information on this record is from Wellington, Piscataquis, Maine  Town Records Volume II. Recorded by Lucy A. Whitehouse. [Note well, that more research is needed to verify names of parents. Other records list Claudens/Cludius Abby as Sarah’s father and Mary Wing as Benjamin’s mother.]

My purpose today is to introduce you to Sarah [Augusta] Abbee, my 2nd great grandmother. To honor her hard work in rural Maine as a mother of at least nine children.

 

Source Information:

Maine State Archives; Augusta, Maine, USA; Pre 1892 Delayed Returns; Roll #: 56 Maine, Marriage Records, 1713-1937, for Benjamin F Hutchins, Piscataquis-1866 image 9, Ancestry.com (accessed 24 Mar 2016), Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 2010, Provo, UT, USA, FamilySearch.org

Seeking Surnames: Seaver

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Seeking female surnames in honor of Women History month, March 2016.

Seaver Deliverance 1767 birth

Seaver Deliverance 1767 birth Feb 7

I’m behind in my daily posts. It takes time healing from a brain concussion. I can slowly return to the internet for research. I decided to spend fifteen minutes a day looking for my female surnames. I save the records found for later research. I don’t know if they are related or not. They are in the same location, time and possible new surname relatives of other family branches. I can’t call it a one name study because I have several surnames.

Case in point; while researching my Beers ancestors in the Watertown/Newton Massachusetts area I came across a Seaver surname. That is a surname of another of my female ancestors from a different branch of my family. [When I first started my research, eons ago, I didn’t save records of surnames, just the ones that we linked to mine. I found out in future research that many times 19th century ancestor in Maine can be traced back to the 17th century ancestors’ location I never thought to look for them.]

Now I save any “known surname,” record I come across to my possible relatives folder.

Today’s find was, Deliverance Seaver daughter of Shubael and Deliverance _____ Seaver, born 7 Feb 1767. Also, listed is a daughter Mary born 8 Nov 1764. Both born Newton, Massachusetts.

I found this entry while browsing a hint for Bertia Beers Ward, in Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, Newton, Birth, Marriages and Death filmstrip 100 of 4059 Ancestry.com Operations 2011 (accessed 23 mar 2016.)

I wander if she is related to Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing fame?

Source Information:

Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Original data: Town and City Clerks of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Vital and Town Records. Provo, UT: Holbrook Research Institute (Jay and Delene Holbrook).

 

Tree Under Review: Sources Available Upon Request

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My Ancestry Tree is my research tree. The sources need to be cleaned up from when I first started my tree, again, on Ancestry in March 2010. [I had used it in the late 1990’s, but found I had more information than they did. Not understanding the full concept back then, I felt I was paying them for me to add my own research to their program. I know understand the importance of sharing information and supporting the FREE Ancestry services made available.]

Many of my sources are just links in the notes section. [I need to format a source citation for them. I’m still learning that process.) I, also,  have paper sources on file in my private collection. I am slowly working on cleaning up my family tree and sources. I made the mistake of inviting someone to add the cousin line to my tree. I quickly learned that was not a good idea.

To make my job easier and to let others know I have sources, for my direct line at least, I have chosen to add the following graphic to my direct line ancestors. Tree Under Review-Sources Available Under Request! My Ancestry Tree is Public: Stearns Butka Family Tree [This link works for members of Ancestry. I’m not sure if it works those that are not a member, even through my tree is public.]

A Tree Under Review

Here is what my tree looks like with the above graphic:

pedigree chart on ancestry

ancestor tree on ancestry

 

You can easily tell who are my direct line ancestors and my cousin lines. I have source citations done for the first five generations.  I’m adding them to my Family Tree Program of my choice first. I will update the Ancestry a little at a time. I do have sources for other generations and some citations done. It is a slow tedious learning curve, for me, in regards to writing the citations. Please bear with me. If you are a cousin line of mine, PLEASE contact me at damegussie@gmail.com for sources. I may or may not have the citations complete, but I will gladly provide the information on non-living relatives in my possession.

Source Citation:

Ancestry  (http://www.ancestry.com: home page accessed (26 Feb 2016); entry for Stearns Butka Family Tree, http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/86776289/family accessed (26 Feb 2016).

 

 

 

Mother’s Binder: Finally Getting Organized

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Mother’s Binder: Finally Getting Organized 1 Feb -7 Feb 2016

Daily work on getting organized is a challenge and a pleasant adventure. One of DearMyrtle’s challenges this week is to work on the first four generation binders, starting with your mother’s maiden name binder. I have folders not binders for my ancestors. I created “coffee table” books with photographs and stories for some of my more recent family members, as Christmas gifts. I will continue doing so.

DearMyrtle’s idea of 3-ring binders with archival safe materials is a more cost effective way of providing a “coffee table” book for little fingers to explore. It also forces me to go through those file folders. While reviewing the folders I can discard duplicates, saving originals, scan to my digital surname/maiden folders on my computer and enjoy the memories that come flooding back. I will also verify that my FTM2014 Family tree program is current with the same information. [I’m happy that Ancestry.com announced that a company has purchased the software and will continue with updates and syncing with Ancestry after the end of 2016. FTM2014 is my program of choice, although RootsMagic is coming in a close second with Legacy. I can’t wait for RootsMagic to be able to sync with Ancestry.com at the end of the year. End of my digression.]

Here is a brief overview of what’s in my Mother’s Binder:

  1. Narratives of traditions, life story and family memories,
  2. Family Group Sheet
  3. Four generation pedigree chart
  4. Original documents,
  5. Copies of on-line documents that I think the family will enjoy,
  6. Photographs of interest [I have photograph albums and scrapbooks also,]
  7. Some trinkets or photographs of my mother’s memorabilia.

Here are a few photographs and a quick story that is in my mother’s binder.

My mother has two 1940 US Census records listing here residence. I know this is the year Shirley’s mother, Irene Elizabeth Place Pease, became ill [listed on New Hampshire Hospital 1940 US Census.]

Shirley’s father, Charles [Lawrence] Pease [informant,] is listed on the 22 Apr 1940 US Census in Monmouth, Kennebec, Maine, living with his mother, Mary [Downs] Pease; son and Shirley’s brother, Arthur Pease; Shirley [Beatrice] Pease and a housekeeper Ethel Hoyt [cousin.]

1940 US Census Monmouth, Maine
1940 US Census Monmouth, Maine

Shirley [Beatrice] Pease  is listed on the 26 Apr 1940 US Census Sutton, Merrimack, New Hampshire in the household of William E Doyle [informant and step grandfather to Shirley,] Tina May [Hutchins-Spooner-Towle] Doyle [Shirley’s maternal grandmother,] her half brother, Fredrick [Francis] Allen.

Here is a photograph of Shirley from 1940.

Shirley playing the Ukulele
Shirley playing the Ukulele

Shirley over the years:

Shirley circa 1948 Sutton, New Hampshire
Shirley circa 1948 Sutton, New Hampshire
Shirley 1978 Pembroke , New Hampshire
Shirley 1978 Pembroke , New Hampshire
Shirley 1984 baptism, Kezar Falls, Maine
Shirley 1984 baptism, Kezar Falls, Maine
Shirley drawing the P.E.T Project Raffle winner 2000
Shirley drawing the P.E.T Project Raffle winner 2000

Shirley was known for making and donating her handmade quilts to various charity fundraisers throughout her lifetime. This was one of the last quilts she donated to the Pets and Elders Together Project (P.E.T. Project) for Rockingham County Visiting Nurses Association & Hospice [Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire] in 2000. The following year the P,E.T. Project quilt raffle was dedicated in her memory.

I have added a copy of this post to her binder and digital Surname/Maiden name folder.

Thank you DearMyrtle for the challenge and memories you have given me. Each day of organizing forces me to review work from years ago. I almost always find something I forgot was in the file folder. The memories are precious and are meant to be remembered and shared.

Source Citation:

Finally Getting Organized 1 Feb -7 Feb 2016

Richley-Erickson, Pat “Finally Get Organized,” Dear Myrtle, DearMyrtle’s Genealogy Your Friend In Genealogy since 1995 Blog, 31 Jan 2016. http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/p/finally-get-organized.html: Access 2 Feb 2016, checklists.

 

First Day of the Month = Backup time

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1 Feb 2016

First Day of the Month = Backup time

Special Day Calendar
Special Day Calendar

You will most likely see another posting about the importance of backing up you work. I plan my backs the first day of each month. It is a SCHEDULED day that is easy to remember.

What do I back up? Everything!!!

  1. to the cloud product of choice. icloud, Evernote, Dropbox, OneNote, I’m sure there are other cloud that you may use, like, Backblaze,  My back up of choice has been a mixture of all listed above and Google Drive.  This past year was a learning curve of what works best for me. I learned I need to K.I.S.S. , Keep It Simple and Straightforward, [you can read more about it here.]
  2. My Microsoft Word Documents, photos, and backup FTM2014 are all backed up on 2 external drives, on-line Google Docs and a Flash drive sent to my sister offsite. If I find that I have added a large amount of work I will do a weekly backup as needed.
  3. I have on-line Trees with Ancestry.com [most up-to-date], FamilySearch.org, and MyHeritage.com [soon to be up-to-date.] I have tried many other online trees; I will be keeping these three trees the most current.
  4. I’m using FTM2014 as my primary program[using FTM since 2002]. Legacy and RootsMagic are still in the learning stages. All three have pluses and minuses to each. [The three trees have a difference of 100 people between each of them. As I clean up and merge duplicates that number is shrinking. To date my FTM2014 is the most accurate numbers and ancestors.

    I’m in the process of transcribing my paper files and Microsoft Word files to my FTM2014 program including media. I will maintain original, certified documents and discard that is easily found on line.

My goal is to continue to stream line and organize my research so that both, my genealogist friends and family members with have a copy that makes sense to them. Citations with improve for my genealogy friends. Stories will entice my family to read about their ancestor’s.

My surname Binders are available for everyone to pick up and read in house. I also have created several family books and calendars for those who are not into my passion.

Family Tree Interviews
Family Tree Interviews