Category Archives: Census

1840 Census Hopkinton, Merrimack, New Hampshire

Hopkinton Census was in the county of Hillsborough, New Hampshire until the 1830 census when it became part of the newly formed Merrimack County, New Hampshire. If you are having trouble with census searches check the town under a different county or even under a different name. If you go to the web site Where in the State is Mom, you will find all the towns and cities in New Hampshire with a brief history of the various names and counties they are in. http://home.comcast.net/~mikebutka5a/site/?/home/&PHPSESSID=0569a1a7da3f203d621dfa4c293f9cd4

I have been working on finding verification of my Chase ancestors this past month. The purpose of my blog is to show you my process of research. I decided to post the search results as I do them. I will make the best effort to include the source and the surnames I have found on each census.

Today’s census search was done in Hopkinton, Merrimack, New Hampshire for the year 1840. The surnames Chase and Fletcher were noted. My source was the Heritage Quest online Census site. I logged in via my local library from my home computer. If you visit your local library they will tell you what sites you can log into from your home computer. This saves you the cost of paying for these research sites. Sites such as Ancstry.com can only be logged into from the library computers without paying for them. 

Browsing the census means page by page review. I hope that my research will prevent you from having to do this.

Heritage Quest online Census Series M704, Roll 238 Page 200 line 8:

Fletcher, William B.: 1 male 30-40 yrs; 1 male 60-70 yrs; 1 female 20-30 yrs; 1 female 30-40 yrs; 1 in maintenance or trade

Heritage Quest online Census Series M740, Roll 241 

Page 215 Last line:

Moses Chase: 1 male 5-10 yrs; 1 male 10-15 yrs; 1 male 30-40 yrs; 1 female under 5; 1 female 10-15 yrs; 1 female 30-40 yrs;

Page 217 line 1:

Enoch Chase: 1 male 30-40 yrs; 1 male 60-70 yrs; 1 female 60-70 years; 2 in agriculture

Page 217 line 7:

Reuben Chase: 2 male under 5; 1 male 5-10 yrs; 1 male 40-50 yrs; 1 female 5-10 yrs; 1 female 20-30 yrs;

Page 217 line 15:

Elbridge F. Chase: 1 male 20-30 yrs; 1 female 20-30 yrs; 1 in agriculture

Page 219 line 9:

Ambrose Chase: 1 male under 5; 1 male 10-15 yrs; 1 male 30-40 yrs; 1 female under 5yrs; 1 female 30-40 yrs2 in agriculture

Page 220 line 21:

Jacob Chase: 1 male 10-15 yrs; 1 male 60-70; 1 female 10-15 yrs; 1 female 20-30 yrs; 1 female 30-40 yrs; 1 maintenance and trade

Page 220 line 27:

Charles Chase: 1 make 10-15 yrs; 1 male 15-20 yrs; 1 male 50-60 yrs; 1 female 10-15 yrs; 1 female 20-30 yrs; 1 female 30-40 yrs; 4 in agriculture

Page 223 line 14:

Daniel Chase: 1 male 60-70 yrs; 1 female 20-30 yrs; 1 female 60-70 yrs;1 in agriculture

Page 223 line 16:

Moses Chase: 2 males 5-10 yrs; 1 male 40-50 yrs; 1 female under 5; 1 female 5-10 yrs; 3 females 10-15; 1 female 30-40 yrs; 2 females 40-50 yrs; 1 learned professional engineer

Page 226 line 28:

Baurch Chase: 1 male 5-10 yrs; 1 male 70-80 yrs; 1 female 20-30 yrs; 1 female 60-70 yrs; learned professional engineers

Page 226 line 29:

Samuel Chase: 1 male 30-40 yrs; 1 female under 5; 1 female 20-30 yrs; 1 in agriculture

Page 227 line 11:

Horace Chace: 2 male 10-15 yrs; 1 male 15-20 yrs; 1 male 30-40 yrs; 1 male 50-60 yrs; 1 female 15-20 yrs; 1 female 40-50 yrs; 1 female 50-60 yrs; 1 in agriculture and 1 in learned professional engineers

Page 227 line 12:

John Chase: 1 male 10-15 yrs; 1male 40-50 yrs; 1 female 10-15 yrs; 1 female 40-50 yrs; 1 female 70-80 yrs; 1 in agriculture

Here is a little link to an 1840 type recipe. Enjoy “Fricasseed Rabbits” by Eliza Leslie

http://www.stavelyandfitzgerald.com/blog.htm?post=844675

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1830 Hopkinton, Merrimack County, New Hampshire

 

This is the first year of the census that Hopkinton will be listed in the newly formed Merrimack County, New Hampshire. MerrimackCounty was set off from RockinghamCounty in 1823 and includes the State Capital of Concord. For more information about Merrimack County history go to http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nhmerrim/ .

Source:

Heritage Quest online Browse mode for census, logged in via local library

Series M19 Roll 76 pages 201-217

Abbreviations:

FWM4 = Free white males under 5 years

FWM9 = Free white males 5-9 years

FWM14 = Free white males 10-14 years

FWM19 = Free White males 15-19

FWM29 = Free white males 22-29 years

FWM39 = Free white males 30-39 years

FWM49 = Free white males 40-49

FWM59 = Free white males 50-59

FWM69 = Free white males 60-69

FWM69 = Free white males 60-69

FWM79 = Free white males 70-79

FWM89 = Free white males 80-89

FWM99 = Free white males 90-99

FWM100+ = Free white males 100 and up

FWF4 = Free white females under 5 years

FWF9 = Free white females 5-10 years

FWF14 = Free white females 10-14 years

FWF19 = Free White females 15-19

FWF29 = Free white females 22-29 years

FWF39 = Free white females 30-39 years

FWF49 = Free white females 40-49

FWF59 = Free white females 50-59

FWF69 = Free white females 60-69

FWF69 = Free white females 60-69

FWF79 = Free white females 70-79

FWF89 = Free white females 80-89

FWF99 = Free white females 90-99

FWF100+ = Free white females 100 and up

FCP & Slaves: The census also breaks down by males and females for slaves and free colored persons. There was only one listed under the surname Chase. For the sake of space I did not list the other abbreviations for each free colored persons or slaves. I did list the person with the household he was in.

 [Letter] means it was raised above as an abbreviation of the name

 

Baruch Chase: 1 FWM29; 1 FWM69; 1 FWF39; 1 FWF69 page 204 line 3

 

Charles Chase: 2 FWM 19; 1 FWM59; 1 FWF29; 1 FWF59 page 204 line 4

 

Daniel Chase: 1 FWM15; 2 FWM29; 1FWM59; 1 FWF 14; 1 FWF19; 1 FWF39; 1 FWF59 page 204 line 5

 

Horace Chase: 2 FWM4; 1 FWM9; 1 FWM49; 1 FWF9; 1FWF39; 1 FWF49 PAGE 204 LINE 6

 

Jacob Chase: 1 FWM4; 1 FWM14; 2 FWM29; 1 FWM59; 1 FWF9; 2 FWF19; 1 FWF29; 1 FWF49 page 204 line 7

 

Moses B. Chase: 1 FWM4; 1 FWM29; 1 FWF4; 1FWF19; 1 FWF59 page 204 line 8

Enoch Chase: 2 FWM19; 1 FWM29; 1 FWM59; 1 FWF14; 1 FWF59 page 204 line 9 (I feel that my ancestor, Jacob, is still in his father’s household as one of the FWM19)

 

Enoch J. Chase: 2 FWM4; 1 FWM14; 1 FWM29; 1 FWF4; 2 FWF9; 1 FWF29 page 204 line 10 ( The letter may be other than a “J”, but I felt, based on family records and the fact the letter curves below the line, that it is the letter “J,” not a “T,” “,I” “F” or “G.” In the colonial handwriting these letters all look similar in style.

 

Daniel D. Chase: 1FWM29; 1 FWF4; 1 FWF29 page 204 line 11

 

Daniel Chase Jr.: 1 FWM4; 1 FWM39; 1 FWF9; 1 FWF15; 1 FWF29; 1 FCP male age 10-24 page 204 line 12

 

Reuben Chase: 1 FWM4; 1 FWM39; 1 FWF9; 1 FWF29 page 204 line 13

 

Moses Chase: 1 FWM4; 1 FWM29; 1 FWF4; 1 FWF29; 1FWF59 page 204 line 14

 

Baruch Chase Jr.: 1 FWM29; 1 FWF19 page 204 line 15

 

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1820 Hopkinton, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

Please bear with me during the posting of the census information. I am trying to verify that everything is correct by checking it at least three times. I also find a possible link to my family and get side tracked by following that lead. Thank you for your patience.

I found only the surname Chase in Hopkinton during the 1820 census.

Source:

Heritage Quest online Browse mode for census, logged in via local library

Series M33 Roll61 page 123-132

Abbreviations:

FWM9 = Free white males under 10 years

FWM15 = Free white males 10-15 years

FWM17 = Free White males 16-18

FWM25 = Free white males 18-26 years

FWM44 = Free white males 26-44 years

FWM45 = Free white males 45 and over

FWF10 = Free white females under 10 years

FWF15 = Free white females 10-15 years

FWF17 = Free White female 16-18

FWF25 = Free white females 18-25 years

FWF44 = Free white females 26-44 years

FWF45 = Free white females 45 and over

AOP = All other free persons              

Slaves

[Letter] means it was raised above as an abbreviation of the name

Barurch Chase: 1FWM15; 1 FWM17; 1FWM45; 1 FWF44; 1 FWF45; 2 in agriculture; page 123

 

John T Chase:  1 FWM9; 3 FWM15; 1 FWM25; 1 FWM45; 1FWF45; 4 in agriculture; page 126

 

Caleb Chase: 1FWM9; 1FWM15; 1FWM45; 2FWF9; 1FWF15; 1FWF44; 1 in agriculture; page 128

 

Jacob Chase 1 FWM9; 2 FWM15; 1 FWM44;  2 FWF9; 1 FWF15; 1 FWF44; 1 in Commerce; page 128

 

Daniel Chase: 1 FWM15; 1 FWM25; 1 FWM45; 1 FWF9; 1FWF 15; 1FWF45; 2 in agriculture; page 128

 

Charles Chase: 1 FWM15; 1 FWM25; 1 FWM45; 1FWF15; 1 FWF25; 1 FWF45; 2 in agriculture; page 130

 

Daniel Chase 2nd: 1 FWM44; 2 FWF9; 2 FWF25; 1 in agriculture; page 130

 

Enoch Chase: 2 FWM9; 3 FWM15; 1FWM17; 1FWM44; 1FWM45; 3 FWF9; 1 FWF15; 2 FWF25; 2 FWF44; 3 FWF45; 5 in agriculture page131

 

Reuben M. Chase: 1 FWM25; 1 FWF25; 1 in agriculture; page 132

 

Moses Chase: 1 FWM15; 1 FWM17; 1 FWM45; 3 FWF9; 1 FWF25; 1 in agriculture; page 132

 

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1810 Census, Hopkinton, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

The 1810 census for Hopkinton had the surnames Chase and Nelson listed.

 

Source:

Heritage Quest online Browse mode for census, logged in via local library

Series M252, Roll 24, pages 601-603 (179-180) ( ) is the numbers on the top of each page.  Heritage Quest has them listed as 601-603. 

Abbreviations:

FWM9 = Free white males under 10 years

FWM15 = Free white males 10-15 years

FWM25 = Free white males 16-25 years

FWM44 = Free white males 26-44 years

FWM45 = Free white males 45 and over

FWF10 = Free white females under 10 years

FWF15 = Free white females 10-15 years

FWF25 = Free white females 16-25 years

FWF44 = Free white females 26-44 years

FWF45 = Free white females 45 and over

AOP = All other free persons              

Slaves

[Letter] means it was raised above as an abbreviation of the name

Baurch Chase; 1 FWM9; 1 FWM15; 1 FWM44; 2 FWF25 page 179 (601)

John Chase 3 FWM9; 1 FWM15; 1FWM 25; 1FWM44; 1FWM45; 3 FWF9; 1 FWF 15; 1 FWF44 page 179 (601)

Caleb Chase: 1FWM9; 1 FWM25; 1FWM44; 2 FWF9; 2 FWF25; 1 FWF44 page 179 (601)

Chars Chase: 1 FWM25; 1 FWM44; 1 FWF9; 1 FWF15; 1 FWF25; 1 FWF44 page 179 (602) I believe (I believe Chars stands for Charles based on my readings of the town history)

Daniel Chase; 1 FWM9; 1 FWM44; 1 FWm45; 1 FWF9; 1 FWF15; 1 FWF44; 2 FWF45 page179 (602)

Moses Chase: 2 FWM9; 1 FWm15; 1 FWm45; 2 FWF9;       1 FWF15; 1 FWF44 page 179 (602)

Enoch Chase: 5 FWM9; 1 FWM44; 1FWF9; 2 FWF15; 3 FWF 44; 1 FWF45 page 180 (603)

I feel that this Enoch Chase is my family line. The 5 children under 10 would be Enoch Jr. born 1801, David born 1803, Thomas born 1805, and Abner born 1808. The 1 male 26-44 years would be Enoch himself. The female child under 10 would be Hannah born 1806. The 2 females 10-15 would be Charlotte born 1797 and his niece Betsey born 1790. The 3 females age 24 to 44 is most likely his wife Mary “Molly” born 1772 and his niece Francis born 1709. The third female in the age range is unknown to me. Based on my records I feel it is a servant living with them. I will research this connection to verify this is my family line.

The town totals break down as follows:

439 Free white males and 827 Free white females totaling 1566. When you add in the 7 colored listed on the census, the town has 1,573 people living there. 336 are in Agriculture, 49 in Manufacturing and 4 work in Commerce.

 

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1800 Census Hopkinton, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1800 Census Hopkinton, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

 

I found the Chase and Fletcher surnames on the 1800 census for Hopkinton, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire.

 

Source:

Heritage Quest online Browse mode for census, logged in via local library

Series M32, Roll 20, pages 548-557

 

Abbreviations:

FWM9 = Free white males under 10 years

FWM15 = Free white males 10-15 years

FWM25 = Free white males 16-25 years

FWM44 = Free white males 26-44 years

FWM45 = Free white males 45 and over

FWF10 = Free white females under 10 years

FWF15 = Free white females 10-15 years

FWF25 = Free white females 16-25 years

FWF44 = Free white females 26-44 years

FWF45 = Free white females 45 and over

AOP = All other free persons              

Slaves

[Letter] means it was raised above as an abbreviation of the name

 

Enoch Chase; 1 FWM9; 1 FWM44; 2 FWF25 page 549

 Daniel Chase; 1 FWM25; 1 FWM45; FWF9; FWF25; FWF45 page 549

Enoch Chase; 1 FWM15; 1 FWF9; 1 FWF15; 1 FWM25; 1 FWF45 page 549

 Jonathan Chase; 1 FWM9; 1 FWM44; 1 FWM45; 1 FWF15; 2 FWF45 page 549

 Charles Chase; 2 FWM9; 1 FWM44; 2 FWF9; 1 FWF44 page 549

 Baurch Chase; 1 FWM9; 1 FWM44; 2 FWF25 page 549

 John T Chase; 3 FWM9; 1 FWM44; 1 FWF9; 1 FWF15; 1 FWF44 page 549

 John Nelson; 1 FWM9; 1 FWM44; 1 FWM45; 2 FWF9; 2 FWF15; 1 FWM44; 1 FWF45 page 553

 Benj [a](Benjamin); 1 FWM9; 2 FWM15; 3 FWM25; 1 FWM44; 3 FWF9; 1 FWF15; 1 FWF44 page 553

 There were:

279 Free white males under 10

172 Free white males 10 – 15

744 Free white males 16 – 25

177 Free white males 26 – 44

136 Free white males 45 and over

785 Free white females under 10

151 Free white females 10-15

247 Free white females 16-25

174 Free white females 26 – 44

149 Free white females 45 and over

1 All other free persons

0 slaves

 

 

 

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1790 Census Hopkinton, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1790 CensusHopkintonHillsboroughCountyNew Hampshire

 

I have completed my research for the 1790 Census in Hopkinton. I have checked it twice and than a third time to see who is naughty or nice. Yes, a reference to that holiday only a few months away. I noticed an advertisement for Christmas ornaments already. Time flies when you’re lost in genealogical research. It reminds me I have very little time to complete my first draft to present to the family as a holiday treat. Only 98 days until Christmas Eve. I refer to the Christian holiday because our ancestors came to the colonies to practice their religion on their own terms.

 

Now back to what this blog is about. Who did I find in Hopkinton, New Hampshire in 1790? I found mainly the Chase surname. I have added Hannah Bean and Elizabeth Sargent to this census because they are two lines that I am searching for to confirm the family connection.

 

Source:

Heritage Quest Online Browse mode for Census

Series M637 Roll 5, Pages 337-338 & 342

Abbreviations:

FWMup = Free white males of 16 years & upward including head of households

FWMun = Free white males of 16 years under 16 years

FWF = Free white females

AOP = All other free persons              

Slaves

[Letter] means it was raised above as an abbreviation of the name

 

Hannah Bean: FWF 4 (faded unsure, this may be 7) pg 337

 

Jon [a] (Jonathan) Chase: FWMup 3; FWMun 1; FWF 5 pg 337

 

Elizabeth Sargent: FWF 4 pg 338

 

Nath [l] (Nathaniel) Sargent: FWMup 4; FWF 5 pg 337

 

Dan Chase: FWMup 2; FWMun 2; FWF 2 pg 342

 

Ambrose Chase: FWMup 2; FWMun 2; FWF 1 pg 342

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Census Search: Before or After Family Generational Search

Census search: When to do it?

 

I’ve been feeling like the “chicken or the egg came first syndrome.” Should I find all surnames on the censuses first or list the ancestors, then review the censuses?  I did some early census research of the New Hampshire town’s in the 1790 Census. I found information on the surnames I was searching, but it didn’t really give me a sense of belonging. Later when I would look for a particular ancestor’s name I was having problems finding them on the internet census links. I knew they were in a certain town during the census year, but I still could find them.

What is a person to do? Well I decided to list the ancestors from my grandparents to the first ancestor to arrive in America. I knew that I would need verification of each generation. How can I do that when the early censuses only listed the head of household, the number of males and females of certain ages? I made a trip to my local library reference desk to find out some answers. My best resource turned out to be a link to Heritage Quest, an online database of historical and genealogical information, census records and family history publications. It is provided by the New Hampshire State Library for local library use. It can be linked to from your home computer through your library using a password and user name. There is no cost to you. You can access it anytime, which was a positive for me. I found the best way to research the census was in the browse mode. The downside to that is you have to go page by page to view, which takes time. The upside of that is that page to page viewing gives you much more information.

I found many more people with the surnames I was looking for, than when I did the search my typing in the name. There were several reasons why I couldn’t find those ancestors names:

  1. Whoever transcribed the names to the database didn’t always read the names correctly. Have you ever tried reading letters from people with poor handing, faded letters or food, ink or coffee stained letters? Well that is what it is like when you read the old census forms. Stearns and Stevens looked very similar. The old type handwriting made it very difficult to distinguish the letters L, F, T or S, C, H from each other.
  2. Many names were written in shorthand or abbreviate, i.e., Nathaniel was written as Nath with a raised a. Sometimes it was the first three letters of the name only.
  3. When the page was copied the categories they were making didn’t show, making it hard to know what each number was for.
  4. Ink bleed through was another problem noted when reading the checks or numbers for each person.

I will be posting the census information by year and town in my future post. I have made the best effort toward accuracy by reviewing the information on each census at least three different times before posting. I am only researching the Stearns, Fletcher, Chase and Nelson surnames and the household they are listed in.  I well post censuses from 1790 to 1900 at this time. I started with Hopkinton, Hillsborough/Merrimack County, New Hampshire because that is how I found a missing link for the Chase surname. It is also the reason I feel that the ancestor’s link should come before the census link, when researching the family surname.

To answer the question when to do the census search, I would say, as stated above, after the generational links have tentatively been made. Others may not agree with my choice, but I found that it made my search much easier when linking and verifying my ancestral family. I found mother’s and fathers living with their children, grand children and even siblings. If I hadn’t known the family links, I wouldn’t have found the correct person. Also knowing the number of children and adults, the ages and gender helped when reviewing the earliest censuses that have no other name than the head of household. The later 1800 census also listed the number of children for the woman living and dead. This provided another resource on finding lost family members you didn’t even know you had. I would then research both birth and death certificates using the parents names.

I hope the census information I will be posting in the upcoming weeks will save you some leg work. The towns I will be doing first will be Hopkinton, Warner, Merrimack, Sutton, Weare, and New London, New Hampshire. These are the towns that my line lived in. I will also be researching Rowley, Chelmsford, Concord, Salsibury, and Westford Massachusetts. These towns were where the original ancestors of my line first arrived in the colonies during the Great Migration of the 1600’s.

You can download blank census forms, free of charge at the following links:

Census Form Links

1790: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1790.pdf

1800: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1800.pdf

1810: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1810.pdf

1820: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1820.pdf

1830: http://www.mymcpl.org/_uploaded_resources/MGC-1830censusblank.pdf

1840: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1840.pdf

1850: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1850.pdf

1860: http://www.mymcpl.org/_uploaded_resources/MGC-1860censusblank.pdf

1870: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1870.pdf

1880: http://www.mymcpl.org/_uploaded_resources/MGC-1880censusblank.pdf

1890: http://www.mymcpl.org/_uploaded_resources/MGC-1890censusblank.pdf

1900: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1900.pdf

1910: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1910.pdf

1920: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1920.pdf

1930: http://c.mfcreative.com/pdf/trees/charts/1930.pdf

1940: http://www.archives.gov/research/census/1940/1940.pdf

 

Other Genealogy Blank Form links:

http://www.inman-family.org/master.htm

http://www.genealogysearch.org/free/forms.html

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